Using rafter ties as base for storage in 1950’s house

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maxdad118

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I’m getting my garage back, it was once a bedroom. I have removed the wall and some of the sheet rock with plans to add more outlets, insulation and new sheet rock. I’m wanting to swap out the 2x4 rafter ties for maybe 2x6(?) for strength. Not sure if it’s needed but want to add some plywood above and use it for storage above. Also, there is added joists when it was a bedroom, I believe I can see what ones were original and the new added ones. I want to get rid of some of these to allow access above. Thoughts?
 

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Snoonyb

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In stick framing rafter ties occur @ 4' OC and the ceiling joists need to be span determined.

In the 4th photo it appears you have a hip roof, which will, in part, limit the capacity.

Were it I, I would double the CJ on either side of the proposed access.
 

Snoonyb

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Notching the bottom of a 2X6, structurally, creates a 2X4.

Full bearing is 2-1/2", so I would cut the pitch, which appears to be 4/12, on each end and then with a little gymnastics, depress the center to allow them to be fitted into place and rolled into position.

Leave a little slack in the pitch cut, to avoid damaging the roof sheeting.
 

Eddie_T

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I can't visualize a rafter tie sitting on the plate.
 

Snoonyb

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In the 2nd photo, the CJ just beyond the elec. box, is a rafter tie.

Stick framing, for garages in CA, is 2 opposing rafters and a single 2X nailed too the rafters and the top plate, with 5-16D's.

The tie, holds the place together.

We used 2X's as long as 24' for these, however a 2X4 for structural framing will only span 7'9" and 2X6 is only 15'6", @ 16" OC, so, CJ's need to be spanned.

Next in the evolution were dia. 2X's let into the top plate, to prevent frees standing garages from racking.

We also used collar ties and span blocking, where appropriate.
 

Eddie_T

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Thanks, I guess in my area the carpenters just call them ceiling joists (unless there is no ceiling).
 

Eddie_T

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I would probably notch 2x6s. They would essentially be 2x4s in shear at the plate but 2x6s with respect to bending. One could probably add joist hangers or load bearing corbels if concerned.
 

maxdad118

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That was my original plan but wanted expertise on this. I still have a bit of work to do before I get to this, more sheet rock to remove, moving stuff around to minimize the mess, lol.
 

mabloodhound

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Pardon the chicken scratch but when you say ‘notch’ are you referring to the lower pic? I was thinking of doing the upper pic. Which makes more sense
Yes, the upper photo is the correct way. No need to remove the 2x4's, just add the 2x6 next to them.
 

maxdad118

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Yes, the upper photo is the correct way. No need to remove the 2x4's, just add the 2x6 next to them.
So my question is this, a lot of these were added to make a bedroom in the garage. I can make out a few of the originals but was is there a ‘rule of thumb’ for the distance between them or quantity of them? I’ve seen other homes of this vintage and they don’t have nearly as many. I’d like to remove a handful of these and ‘beef’ up the existing with 2x6’s and decking on top for some light storage
 

Snoonyb

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So my question is this, a lot of these were added to make a bedroom in the garage. I can make out a few of the originals but was is there a ‘rule of thumb’ for the distance between them or quantity of them? I’ve seen other homes of this vintage and they don’t have nearly as many. I’d like to remove a handful of these and ‘beef’ up the existing with 2x6’s and decking on top for some light storage
I addressed as "typical" in post #2, IE. as 4' OC. The span for 2X4's & 2X6's, has also been addressed.

If the span is, IE the width of the garage, wider than those, then simply increase the size to 2X8 or 10, whatever suffices.

Also typical, in stick frame dwelling of your dwellings era, CJ were placed at 16" OC to support the common base for plaster lath, eventually 1/2" drywall, however, in some instances, at 24" OC, where 5/8" drywall was used, because the panel stability of 1/2" wasn't sufficient, resulting in sagging.
 

Guzzle

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You might have the option of thru-bolting plates on the ends of the 2x4s. The corps who make this things can advise you on the fastener schedule, they want their stuff to work.

I guess the worst that happens to people who overload their attics is that their ceiling drywall cracks. Our ceiling drywall is doing that in a large span with nothing overhead. Someday, I might go up there & run a vertical cable from the span center to the roof crest. That might even be an option for you.
 

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