want to stain an unfinished redwood deck

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merk

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Had a deck recently built (redwood) and the wood is unfinished - they didn't apply anything to the wood after picking it up from the lumber yard.

I picked out a transparent stain.

Do i need to power wash the deck or should i sand it as well?

I had also applied some stain to a spare piece of lumber and it looks pretty faded to me compared to when i first applied it (2-3 months ago). Is that normal? Is there something i can do to prevent that from happening or at least slow it down?

Thanks

20160408_163147.jpg
 
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slownsteady

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redwood decks don't generally show up on the east coast, so some of us won't be of any help. Wait for one of the west-coasters to show up.
 

Snoonyb

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Redwood especially, develops mill glaze, which is its way of protecting itself.

Its premature, at this time, to stain the deck. Wait until next spring before cleaning it, with a 1,500+ PSI pressure washer. Even then, when you apply the stain the level of permanence may not be satisfactory until you repeat the process the next year
 

merk

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Why would i want to wait? Doesn't the mill glaze have to be cleaned off before staining?

If i need to stain it once and then stain it again a few months later or a year later to really get the stain to set, that's fine.
 

Snoonyb

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You apparently missed this part of msg. #4; "Its premature, at this time, to stain the deck. Wait until next spring before cleaning it, with a 1,500+ PSI pressure washer."

Repeated cleaning and reapplication of stain will eventually result in a reduction of the frequency.

Staining was your choice, or you could have painted it.

So now you are faced with a lifetime of repeated maintenance, little difference in painting.

And, you've depleted our stock of coastal redwood.
 

merk

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No, i didn't miss that part - that's why i was asking why i need to wait. Why is it premature to stain at this time? What needs to happen before it's ok to apply the stain?
 

Snoonyb

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You need to allow the material to age and condition.

You've seen the results of not waiting, as evidenced by you sample.

The results will be nearly the same the first time you stan, even after having waited a year, and you'll need repeated staining to eventually achieve the results you desire, which will continue need to be refreshed on at least a biannual routine.

It's the nature of the product.
 

merk

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So the only reason to wait at this point is i'll just have to do it again sooner? i.e. if i'd rather have it looking a little nicer and don't mind doing the extra work, it's ok to stain it now?

thanks
 

Snoonyb

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Suit yourself.

From msg.#1;"I had also applied some stain to a spare piece of lumber and it looks pretty faded to me compared to when i first applied it (2-3 months ago)."
 

merk

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Thanks, i just read that, i'll see what products i can pick up for cleaning and brightening - didnt even know there was a way to brighten wood.
 

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