water heater question

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by brit1, Aug 9, 2018.

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  1. Aug 9, 2018 #1

    brit1

    brit1

    brit1

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    Looking to downsize and buy a smaller home. Saw one I liked but the owner had added a sink/toilet to the water heater and stacked washer/dryer area and it looks cramped and unattractive. Only other place for water heater would be in the garage, wondering if that would be ok as I don't mind spending the money to redo the bathroom.
     
  2. Aug 9, 2018 #2

    maxdad118

    maxdad118

    maxdad118

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    Keep it close to the bathroom if possible so your not waiting for hot water for a shower or bath! You can put it outside in a shed too and insulate the shed. Be sure and put combustion and ventilation openings if it’s gas.
     
  3. Aug 9, 2018 #3

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

    Fixer Upper Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    Sounds like the past owner needed a closer location for a partial bathroom and made due with what was there. Without knowing the layout of the house it is imposable to be specific about what could be done.


    If you live in freezing climate I wouldn’t want it in the unheated garage.


    If the toilet and sink are not needed by you just remove them and cap the pipes.


    Welcome to the forum.
     
  4. Aug 9, 2018 #4

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

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    If you have gas available a tankless water heater could be a real viable solution. New tank water heaters are getting bigger as the government requires additional insulation now. Here in NC it is pretty common for water heaters to be in the garage, as basements are pretty rare. They also stick them in attics which I don't like or recommend.

    Thing with tankless water heaters is you really need them to be close to the points of use. They aren't great if you have a house with points of use on opposite sides of the house. Standard recirculating pumps defeat the energy-saving design of a tankless. They do make recirculating pumps for tankless, you activate them manually before turning on the taps and give them a minute to get the hot water to your point of use.
     

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