Water pressure question

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum' started by Parrothead, Apr 24, 2012.

  1. Apr 24, 2012 #1

    Parrothead

    Parrothead

    Parrothead

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    Hi all. My house is on a shared well, and the pump is on a neighbor's property. When I run my wash machine or toilet, there is a significant drop in water pressure. Is there a way to raise the pressure in my home? An inline pump, perhaps, or some other way?
     
  2. Apr 25, 2012 #2

    joecaption

    joecaption

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    Need to know what sized line you have for the main, and supplys.
    Do you have your own pressure tank?
    What type pipes do you have?
     
  3. Apr 25, 2012 #3

    Speedbump

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    If your pipes are large enough, a booster pump might be the answer. Turning up the pressure at the pressure switch might be a big help too. Do you know what kind of pump they have? Submersible or Jet?
     
  4. Apr 25, 2012 #4

    JoeD

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    Pressure systems on a well will normally have a pressure drop when you use water. Pump has a cut in and a cut out setting. You need to verify what those settings are and work form there.
     
  5. Apr 27, 2012 #5

    Parrothead

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    Main, 3/4". Otherwise 1/2". All copper but due to a basement renovation project I am probably going to have to reroute some pipes, and when I do , I will use PEX tubing. I do not have a pressure tank. The only one is at the neighbor's house where the well is. The well serves three homes, and is a submersible pump.
     
  6. Apr 27, 2012 #6

    JoeD

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    The first thing you need to determine is where the problem is. You need to verify the pressures at the pump. If the pressure is low at the pump there is no sense in looking for problems in your house.
     
  7. Apr 27, 2012 #7

    Parrothead

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    Ok I will get with the neighbor to look at the pressure tank. How much pressure should there be? The well serves three homes.
     
  8. Apr 27, 2012 #8

    JoeD

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    Typical hi-lo pressures should be in the range of 20-40 or 30-50.
     
  9. Apr 28, 2012 #9

    joecaption

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  10. Apr 28, 2012 #10

    Parrothead

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  11. Apr 30, 2012 #11

    Speedbump

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    Adding a bladder tank will only momentarily give you better pressure. Then it's up to your plumbing and piping along with the pump to keep up with your usage.
     

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