Weird draining problem - Biting the bullet!

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Lancer525

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I've decided to bite that proverbial bullet, and just try to fix the [email protected]#$& thing on my own. I think I'm a fairly smart guy, and even though I'm not a professional plumber, I have done jobs similar to this before and completed them without destroying the house. I'm pretty angry that I got so frustrated with this thing, that it just made me more angry that I was willing to give up. So...

The part I'm going to have to get the snake into is that black cast iron drain stack. In order to do that, I am going to have to remove and replace all of the parts in between the tailpieces of the drains in the sink, right on out to the cast iron stack. All of them. Everything. I foresee that there is going to be a problem with all that in the future anyway, so I may as well do it all in one fell swoop.

My problem is, I don't know what all these parts are called, or even what size they are! I went to one of the local plumbing supply parts stores in town, and showed the guy the picture I have. He took one quick look, and said "Yep! Soon as you give us a list of the parts you'll need, we'll be glad to help" and then walked away to go chat with someone else. I don't know what the names of all the parts are, and I get the feeling that not only did I interrupt his conversation, but that he could have looked a little more closely at the photo and known exactly what I needed. 🙄

So, can someone help me come up with a list of what I need so that I can go to one of his competitors and get all the right parts so I can finally try to do this job? 😁 I'll need to know what the names are of everything connected to the tailpieces coming out of the bottom of the drains, on out to the cast iron drain stack. I want to use ABS, because I think it will be easier to deal with in the long run than PVC will.

I'd also specifically like to know what the part that's labeled 1 is called. I tried to describe it to someone on the phone, and failed miserably. I can state that it isn't 1.25 or 1.5, but it's an odd size, because the threads labeled A are 1.689" in diameter. The plumbing was probably installed sometime back in the 50's, so it may not be a standard size.

Thanks!

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Snoonyb

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Lancer525

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Wow, you guys are right on the ball. Amazing, if I do say so myself.

Since you mentioned it, I'll look into this PB Blaster stuff, and will apply it liberally as soon as I get it. I don't plan on starting this until Thursday, since I have most of the week off next week because of the Tuna Mint.

Thanks ever so much!!
 

Lancer525

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The tough part will be getting "A" removed from the cast Santee.

The parts are standard 1.5" ABS and the fitting are minimal, by comparison.

These should;d do it;

https://www.homedepot.com/p/NIBCO-1-1-2-in-ABS-DWV-Hub-x-MIP-Adapter-C5804HD112/100346244

https://www.homedepot.com/p/VPC-1-1-2-in-x-24-in-Plastic-ABS-Pipe-12015/202300518



They are also available from Lowe's, ACE & Menards.

1-1/2" Really? It measures bigger than that. I wouldn't have ever guessed it was that size.

Thanks!
 

cdestuck

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My guess on the part going into the cast iron is that you’ll have to cut it. Probably by taking a hacksaw blade or if you can get a long metal blade for a Sabre saw. At two or three places on this piece, make saw cuts from the inside of the piece. Cut it just to you reach the threads of the cast iron. Then with a hammer try to knock these pieces inward away from the cast iron. Now remember your dealing with cast so don’t beat the living crap out of it.
I hope by Blasting it you can get it out but looks like plenty of rust there
 
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I will almost guarantee you will have to cut the nipple going into the cast tee out. Cdestuck is right. Cut the pipe from the inside toward the threads until you start to see the female threads in the tee. Three places should be enough. Cut most of the excess pipe outside the tee off. I use a small, narrow chisel to gently tap the pieces free from the tee. I also use a sawsall with a medium length, medium fine saw blade to make my cuts.

The threads in the tee might only be 1 & 1/4". It appears that the first piece coming out of the cast is a 1 & 1/4" nipple with a 1 & 1/2' reducer bushing threaded over it. Everything else is 1 & 1/2' after that. So, you will need a 1 & 1/4" to 1 & 1/2" thread adapter. IE a piece that has 1 & 1/4" threads on one end and a socket for 1 & 1/2" pipe on the other. If you cannot get that, find a reducing coupler from 1 & 1/4 to 1 & 1/2. Apply ample thread tape or plastic compatible thread compound to the threads and screw into the tee. Cut your 1 & 1/2 pipe to required length and attach a 1 & 1/2" trap adapter to the end. You will also need a PVC trap tail to replace the chrome trap component you have in there now.

Just curious, why do you think ABS will be easier to use than PVC? Other than possibly availability, in Georgia, I would not think there would be a problem using PVC. In cental IL, ABS is harder to come by. I rarely see ABS even in older homes. My daughter lives in Alaska and they use ABS up there. Something with the cold, I guess.

Oh, A is a 1 & 1/4" pipe nipple and 1 is a 1 & 1/2" to 1 & 1/4" reducer bushing.
 
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Lancer525

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After three days of spraying PB Blaster on those fittings every few hours, I'm at the moment of truth.

Wish me luck, because I'm going to try to take it all apart tomorrow morning.

I've also been tapping the cast iron and the metal pipe with a hammer (not bashing it, just taps, as I saw somewhere that this helps the PB get into the threads with the vibration breaking up the rust, or some such thing) in between sprayings. I have an 18" section of galvanized pipe from a fence post that fits around the end of my monkey wrench for leverage too. It's now or never. I'm on the precipice. Dangling from the ledge. On the verge. Standing at the door. Can't think of another cliche...

As for going with the ABS, two different people advised me to use it. A proprietor at a competitor of the guy that walked away from me in the first store, and a plumber in the big box store. The guy had on a uniform shirt for a local company, which is how I know he was a plumber. That, and he said "Hey, I'm a plumber!" when I asked him about the task I'm doing. I figure if they're advising it, there must be a reason.

I suppose that I'm going to have to figure out all the parts in between the tailpieces at the sink, through the MPT to Hub Adapter. Thank you, Fireguy5674 for the recommendation about the reducer/adapter thing. I am definitely going to need that. Probably ought to put it fairly close to the part that threads into the cast iron. I have several rolls of high-quality Teflon tape, and the correct ABS pipe glue, and enough hubris to think I can actually accomplish this task.

Normally, when I would do plumbing jobs at the old house, I would just take the parts with me to match up in the store, but I won't have that luxury this time around. I think if I show the pictures I have, the guy at the store (the competitor) can advise me. He looks to be in his 70s, so I'd guess he's been around a while. His place is the same one my dad went to, so they've been in business a long time. Longevity has it's benefits. As long as I don't have to go back to that first store. That guy was just standoffish.


I hope I won't have to cut it apart, but I do have one of those oscillating saws, as well as a collection of Dremel attachments and three packs of blades for metal for the jigsaw. I also have half a dozen loose hacksaw blades, and one of those handles that allows you to use it like a keyhole saw. If I have to cut it, I'll cut it. Don't want to, and I hope I won't have to, but there we are.

I'll try to remember to take pictures of the job as it's going. I've also warned my spouse that she may hear some foul language coming from the kitchen. She reminded me that we have plenty of bourbon.
 

Lancer525

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Slow going. The plumbing supply place was closed today for a family emergency. So, I have gotten everything off, except that threaded piece that goes into the cast iron. It moved a little tiny fraction of an arc, but I don't want to break the cast iron. So, I'm spraying PB and will keep at it.
 

cdestuck

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Slow going. The plumbing supply place was closed today for a family emergency. So, I have gotten everything off, except that threaded piece that goes into the cast iron. It moved a little tiny fraction of an arc, but I don't want to break the cast iron. So, I'm spraying PB and will keep at it.
Slow and steady gets the job done
 

cdestuck

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Slow going. The plumbing supply place was closed today for a family emergency. So, I have gotten everything off, except that threaded piece that goes into the cast iron. It moved a little tiny fraction of an arc, but I don't want to break the cast iron. So, I'm spraying PB and will keep at it.

Will help also to work your rusted piece back and forth as you try to get it out.
 

Lancer525

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As many of you may have guessed, I hit a snag with the project, and I've had to put it on hold again!

The snag actually has nothing to do with the plumbing under the sink, but rather an unrelated injury that's preventing me from getting down on the floor and climbing partially into the cabinet! Well, to be honest, I can get down on the floor and into the cabinet, I just can't get back up again. So, until my back heals up enough, the spouse won't let me do anything. She had the devil of a time helping me get up off the floor this morning, and refuses to do it again. I don't blame her. I'm twice the man I was when she married me 32 years ago...

So, we're without a sink in the kitchen temporarily.
 
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Well, I'd come help, but I just finished helping a buddy move a flue pipe and between the attic and the roof I was about crippled the day after I did that. So, by the time I heal up and drive to Georgia, you will be done. 😁
 

billshack

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you did not have to remove all that galvanized piping. I would turn the chrome nut just after the chrome elbow counter clock wise . then pass the fish. then just replace the chrome p-trap . I do not know why other did not caught this .
 

Snoonyb

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you did not have to remove all that galvanized piping. I would turn the chrome nut just after the chrome elbow counter clock wise . then pass the fish. then just replace the chrome p-trap . I do not know why other did not caught this .

Because the question and request was made.

Also ABS & PVC are not as prone to material build up, and clogging.

From post #1; "So, can someone help me come up with a list of what I need so that I can go to one of his competitors and get all the right parts so I can finally try to do this job? 😁 I'll need to know what the names are of everything connected to the tailpieces coming out of the bottom of the drains, on out to the cast iron drain stack. I want to use ABS, because I think it will be easier to deal with in the long run than PVC will."
 
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