What’s going on here!

Discussion in 'HVAC' started by jw31bn, Apr 4, 2019.

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  1. Apr 4, 2019 #1

    jw31bn

    jw31bn

    jw31bn

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    I live in North Carolina and it was 68 today. I cut my ac on, just to see how i would do. I noticed the these little lines start to freeze up but the coil was sweating and the large suction pipe outside was sweating too, which IMG_1759.jpg is a good sign, i think. Can anyone tell me why these lines are frosted over
     
  2. Apr 4, 2019 #2

    pjones

    pjones

    pjones

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    Looks like you are frosting up on the bottom rows also. If continued to run like that it will eventually cause the whole coil to ice.

    Check your airflow to make sure vents are open, filter is clean return air is unobstructed, ac coil is clean on both sides, etc...

    Failing that it could be a low head pressure issue ( probably not since your outdoor temperature was 68).

    My guess, without putting gauges on it or looking at it, in your case would be that it is low on charge. Units only become low on charge if there is a leak so you would need to find and fix the leak before adding the proper amount of refrigerant.

    You shouldn’t run the unit with the door off like that. I get that it was probably only for a short time but it’s not really good, specially since you don’t have a TXV feeding your coil. Also just so the info is out there for whoever searches this thread later, don’t blindly add Refrigerant to that system, it needs to be charged very specifically. For leak repair and charging you will probably want to involve your local HVAC company and have them come out to help you.
     
    billshack likes this.
  3. Apr 4, 2019 #3

    jw31bn

    jw31bn

    jw31bn

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    Ok, I’ll call the Tech, from your knowledge we’re would the leak most likely come from
     
  4. Apr 4, 2019 #4

    pjones

    pjones

    pjones

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    It could come from anywhere. Quite often threaded fittings and service access valves Leak, but every unit is a new adventure. You don’t know until you find it. If you are lucky you will find oil spray or oil dips in an area. If you see oil then you know that you are close. Not all leaks bring oil with then though, those leaks are a bit harder to find.
     
  5. Apr 4, 2019 #5

    kok328

    kok328

    kok328

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    Assuming capillary tubes in place of a TXV?
    Leak testing can get really expensive and that's why most customers opt for the "gas & go" approach.
     
  6. Apr 4, 2019 #6

    jw31bn

    jw31bn

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    What u mean gas and go approach
     
  7. Apr 4, 2019 #7

    jw31bn

    jw31bn

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    Is a an old unit and i am saving up for a new one. Should i just have them fill it and just keep going till i get my new one
     
  8. Apr 5, 2019 #8

    pjones

    pjones

    pjones

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    It shouldn’t take long to find the leak, it’s the repair that can sometimes get expensive (depending what and where it is located). It could also be very cheep to fix and then you won’t have to worry about it again for a long time.

    If you manage to find someone who is willing to overlook the refrigeration codes and top your system up without leak checking then you should know you are 100% throwing that money away since you KNOW it will leak out again. It may last a year, it may last a month, It’s a roll of the dice and not good for the environment.

    I would suggest you have them use an electronic leak detector to quickly locate the leak and first determine what is leaking. Not all leaks are hard to fix, in fact quite often they can be very simple. Once they locate where they are looking with the electronic detector then they can zero in with soap and then discuss a solution with you once they find the leak.
     
  9. Apr 5, 2019 #9

    WyrTwister

    WyrTwister

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    DIY , my first step with a leak is to replace the Schrader valves , in the service fittings , at the condenser . As preventive maintenance .

    On automotive A/C , I have had pretty good luck using UV dye and UV light .

    As a word of caution , I read many HVAC contractors seem to be more interested in selling than servicing ?

    Sounds like you are looking to replace , some time down the road ? That is fine . I also read the skill and integrity of the installer is more important than the brand of equipment .

    Wyr

    God bless
     

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