What do they call this part for the shower

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afjes_2016

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Yes, what I like about PEX compared to copper piping is that I can before actually installing everything and finding I am missing a part or something is not connected properly I can do a dry-run on a complete assembly right there on the floor. Even using some PEX and then cutting it all off before I install it for real I am not wasting that much material. Even a few clamps that I use etc are no big deal to use and then remove from the test assembly.

Yes, we both know sometime at the big box stores trying to find someone in the department that knows what they are doing is no easy task. I could end up asking an associate in the plumbing department questions and then find out half way thru he/she really does not know as they are just covering the associate on lunch from that department and they are normally in the paint department. That happens a lot there and the worst part is they will normally not tell you that when you ask them questions. You kind of have to figure it out for yourself. Even in the electrical department if I can't find something and ask an associate where it is that is working the department and they have no clue what I am talking about gets very frustrating. Then I have to go searching the shelves for what I want/need.

I think if I can't find someone in plumbing that seems to know what they are talking about I will go to customer service and ask for a plumbing associate, maybe that will be better.
 

afjes_2016

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Update:
Ok, first step is accomplished. I went to the HDepot today and within 2 minutes in the plumbing section an associate came up to me and asked me if I needed assistance. Wow!! That has to be a first.

First question to him was how familiar he is with bathtub faucet/shower assemblies. His response was not a problem. I explained to him quickly what my challenge was, he laughed and said follow me. First we went to the wall of tub faucet assemblies - all the different complete sets that are displayed on the wall. I picked out a Moen as I know they are good quality and I did not want to spend too much more than I had to for now.

We spent 15 minutes with him giving me adapters etc which I may need as backup. It is a 25 mile one way trip to the HDepot so I wanted him to give me things that he even thought I may need. Anything I did not need at the end I could return.

So I guess you can say I got lucky with first of all even finding someone and second, someone who knew what they were talking about.

I have a few other projects in the works now before I tackle this. So it may be a few weeks before I get to it. Can't wait too long as I will have to install the steam radiator again which sits right in front of the access to the work area. Cold weather coming up.

Thanks to everyone that suggested and helped.

I'll let you know how it turns out when I am done.
 

afjes_2016

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I am missing a part. See pic attached. I don't know what they call this part (red arrows). It is for the tub spout from the valve assembly.

A right angle double female connector (1/2")

Also, here is the link to the manual for the valve assembly I purchased.
Moen INS972F - Figure 3A instructs to install the flow director. 1A shows it is there (shower section) first then to remove it and put into the tub spout section. What is the flow director? What is its purpose?

I bought putty and tape. Do I use both on the threads of the connectors or one or the other.

Thanks!!
 

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Snoonyb

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That's standard brass 1/2" 90degree elbow.

The flow director is actually a flow restrictor so that the flow doesn't exceed the 2.5 GPM efficiency standards, mandated.

When they say to remove, then reinstall, it's if the supply lines are from above or below, and you rotate the faucet 180 degrees.
As yours are, and in your configuration, you can leave it as installed and shipped, for the shower arm.

They recommend teflon tape, but you can use either
 

afjes_2016

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Thanks for your reply snoonyb - much appreciated.

Would this be the correct elbow to purchase?

Thanks for the explanation of the flow restrictor. I understand. Since my water feed is from below I will leave the flow restrictor in the shower arm. I was wondering why they kept inverting the assembly. It was confusing me.

Ok, I can use either the putty or the tape.

:thumb:
 

Snoonyb

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Yep, that's it.

The tape is convenient to use and store, and lose track of, and sometimes the putty, as it ages will form a cake like film.

I'll usually stretch the teflon and go around the fitting twice.
 

afjes_2016

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Thanks snoonyb - I ordered the elbow.

Ok on the tape.

Now that I think I will have all the parts I need I will try to prebuild the unit without placing it in the wall just to make sure I have the parts and everything fits.
 

bud16415

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When I wrap the tape around the male half of the threaded connection wrap it in the direction that when you screw it in the tape end is trailing the direction of turn. Doing it the other direction causes the tape to sometimes bunch up. Try and get the tape close to the end of the fitting but not hanging over. This is not as important on water lines as with gasses or oil fittings where small pieces of tape can break off and plug things up.
 

Snoonyb

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Also, you'll find that the length of the pipe for the tub spout may need adjustment, and there are escutcheon trim pieces available.
 

afjes_2016

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Yes Bud I have used plumber's tape before on other projects. I normally make sure that the tape remains flat and I wrap it around the threads as though and in the same direction I would be putting a nut onto the threads. I then take my fingers and place them on the tape and threads once applied and gently run my fingers over the threads in the direction again as if I was threading a nut on it to be sure that the tape is smooth and layered evenly over the threads.

Yes snoonyb I have concerns about the length of the spout pipe. I have a few different lengths (4 and 5 inche) to work with. I was not sure what length I would need. What are "escutcheon trim"? Can you give me a link to maybe one on the home depot site so I know what they look like please.
 
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