What is the proper tool to make long cuts?

Discussion in 'Carpentry and Woodworking' started by farmerjohn1324, Mar 30, 2018.

  1. Mar 30, 2018 #1

    farmerjohn1324

    farmerjohn1324

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    For example, to cut these pieces of wood lengthwise. The longest are 12'.

    Is a circular saw not appropriate for this?
     

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  2. Mar 30, 2018 #2

    Sparky617

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    A table saw would be the best to get long straight cuts.
     
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  3. Mar 30, 2018 #3

    farmerjohn1324

    farmerjohn1324

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    At what length of cut do you use a table saw versus a circular saw?
     
  4. Mar 31, 2018 #4

    Gary

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    I use a table saw all the time, except for the few times that a circular saw is more convenient.
     
  5. Mar 31, 2018 #5

    nealtw

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    Depending on what you are cutting, how wide and what you are using it for. A lot has to do with ability and experience on a saw type.
     
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  6. Mar 31, 2018 #6

    Sparky617

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    For rough carpentry, a circular saw with a fence ill usually does the trick. For cabinetry a table saw, followed up with a trip through a jointer to make the edge really smooth, especially if gluing it up.

    On short pieces of wood, a table saw is safer, having the blade in a fixed position and using a pusher stick to push the wood through the cut is safer than trying to hold on to a piece of wood while you rip cut it. Given a choice, I would always use a table saw but you don't always have a choice. To make rip cuts for a short piece of wood, I'd start with a longer piece of wood, rip it and then cut it to length. Anything to keep my fingers away from the rapidly spinning blade.
     
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  7. Mar 31, 2018 #7

    JoeD

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    No particular length. If I am at home where my table saw is I use it. If I am at the cottage where no table table is I use my circular saw.

    If I had a choice any lengthwise cut would be done on the table saw.
     
  8. Apr 3, 2018 #8

    CallMeVilla

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    Get a portable table saw. A used on is inexpensive and will do the job. Build an outfeed table or roller setup. It will surprise you with accuracy and capacity. Just make sure your rip fence is carefully aligned.

    DEWALT SAW.jpg
     
  9. Apr 4, 2018 #9

    farmerjohn1324

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    I got one for $99 at HD.
     
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  10. Apr 4, 2018 #10

    nealtw

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    Practise helps. Feed it from the end with the switch.:rolleyes:
     
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  11. Apr 6, 2018 #11

    Gary

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    And keep your fingers out of the spinning disc thing.
     
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  12. Apr 20, 2018 at 12:12 AM #12

    Mastercarpenty

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    Once you acquire and get used to using a table saw, you'll wonder why you didn't do it sooner. Learn how to use it safely and always give it great respect, for it cuts humans more quickly than it can cut wood.

    Phil
     
  13. Apr 23, 2018 at 5:54 AM #13

    farmerjohn1324

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    How can I make this cut? I don't think a table saw or mitre saw can do it. This is for the wedge shaped piece on the right of this shelf.

    The wood is 6.5" wide and 1.25" tall. The angles are 79 degrees on top-left and 11 degrees on bottom-right.
     

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  14. Apr 23, 2018 at 6:30 AM #14

    nealtw

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    I would do it on the end of the long piece with a skill saw with the board on edge,
    Or on a chop saw with a table built so the board and be set at 90 degrees from the fence
    Or with that small piece glue some 1 1/4 to the bottom side so it will slide on the fance of the table saw and the pencil line would be straight with the fence.
     
  15. Apr 23, 2018 at 3:30 PM #15

    mabloodhound

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    When I have to cut something sort like that, I always start with a much longer piece so I have something to hold onto.
    I mark it as you did and then eyeball the cut on the table saw. After getting it cut and smoothed I trim to length.
    It doesn't have to be 100% perfect because you can use some caulk to fill in a gap.
    With a bit of practice on the table saw you can do eyeball (freehand) cuts pretty well.

    Dave Mason
     

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