What machine for digging shallow trenches ?

Discussion in 'Garden and Lawncare' started by HighDesertHomeOwner, Dec 2, 2010.

  1. Dec 2, 2010 #1

    HighDesertHomeOwner

    HighDesertHomeOwner

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    for irrigation hoses and 1/2 inch small electrical conduit?

    Would an edger be powerful enough for this purpose?

    I want to bury 5/8 diameter irrigation hoses and 1/2" PVC pipes and 1/2 inch electrical conduits into dirt.

    What least expensive gas driven machine is best for this purpose? What name to look for on Craigslist?

    Thanks
     
  2. Dec 2, 2010 #2

    handyguys

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    It depends on how deep and how far. Any ole shovel will do the trick and for many jobs you will be done in the time it takes to get a machine on site and setup.
     
  3. Dec 2, 2010 #3

    HighDesertHomeOwner

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    My area does not freeze much so about 5 inches deep and narrow 2-3" wide trenches are what I have in mind.

    I want a machine, gas or even electric if powerful enough.

    What should I look for?

    Thanks
     
  4. Dec 4, 2010 #4

    havasu

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    Is this electrical conduit for 12 vdc or 120 vac? If this is 120 vac, most codes require this to be buried a mimimum of 18" below grade, and in a waterproof conduit. I'd recommend you contact your local building inspectors for proper advice. A Ditch Witch or a 24" walk behind trenchers are common at local rental facilities.
     
  5. Dec 6, 2010 #5

    rander

    rander

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    Most big box home stores and tool rental agencies rent small walk-behind trenchers that dig a trench about 4" to 6" wide and up to 2 feet deep (depth is adjustable). They can be rented by the hour, day or week. This should do the job you want to do. Although a "small" trencher you will need a small trailer to haul it and a vehicle capable of pulling it. This is not the cheapest way to do the job it is fast once you get to digging and makes a neat precise trench.
     
  6. Dec 6, 2010 #6

    Speedbump

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    If you don't mind spending the money, this is what I use and love the thing.
    How Pitcher Pump Works - Pumps - PumpsAndTanks.com

    I'm sure you can buy it cheaper on line from someone other than the manufacturer. That's just their suggested list price.
     
  7. Dec 6, 2010 #7

    Speedbump

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    If you don't mind spending the money, this is what I use and love the thing.
    EZ-Trench - J1000 7" Trencher

    I'm sure you can buy it cheaper on line from someone other than the manufacturer. That's just their suggested list price.
     
  8. Dec 7, 2010 #8

    HighDesertHomeOwner

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    How deep does the Rototiller dig?

    I do not like renting because I like to meter out chores slowly to ease the body.

    I plan to buy something at Craigslist and sell it later if I want to.
     
  9. Dec 7, 2010 #9

    handyguys

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    the depth a rototiller digs is dependent on how rocky the soil is and the size of the machine. A small Mantis, Stih Yardboss or similar wont really dig a trench. No rototiller will dig a trench but it could loosen the ground that it could then be shoveled more easily. They will cut a pretty wide path.

    Perhaps just hire out the trench work? It doesn't make sense to buy a trencher for one project and if you don't want to rent (and get it done in one day) then you have limited options. Maybe even find some of those guys that sometimes hang out in front of the home center and hire them for a few hours and buy some $10 shovels. That may be cheaper than renting a machine actually. Don't run for political office if you do that and they are illegal immigrants tho. I don't support hiring illegals but I do support hiring day laborers who need the work.
     
  10. Dec 7, 2010 #10

    havasu

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    Well said, Mr. President! :clap:
     
  11. Dec 7, 2010 #11

    handyguys

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    hahahhaa - I spend too much time in politics in addition to my Handyguys duties. They rarely cross paths but this is one area they do.

    Personally I have hired folks for labor jobs. I have even visited job sites to see if someone wanted some after hours work. I hired some dry wall guys once that way.

    The tough question comes when you hire a firm to do some work and then the labor THEY provide is of questionable legality. Do I as the homeowner have the responsibility of checking credentials? I would argue no. Meg Whitman got in trouble even tho she didn't break the law, it may have cost her the Governorship of California. She hired a firm to provide household services, the person that firm sent had provided fraudulent credentials to her employer. Whitman still took political heat and the illegal was celebrated by her opponents.
     
  12. Dec 8, 2010 #12

    havasu

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    Unfortunately, what Meg did is done everywhere. Most people don't have Gloria Allred in their back pockets and have enough juice to sway the votes as Jerry Brown did. California's new motto: "Same ol -same ol!" Sorry for the rant....stay tuned for our regular broadcasting........
     
  13. Dec 11, 2010 #13

    oldognewtrick

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    Origional Poster. you need to bury the irrigation as deep as required by local codes. Call and they will tell you how deep to bury.

    Now Handyguy and Havasu have raised an interesting topic, and one that really kinda fits into this thread. If I go to the big box store, street corner and hire a day labor to dig my irragation trench, at what point am I responsible for their past, present, future illegal behavior?
     
  14. Dec 11, 2010 #14

    havasu

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    I'm more concerned with the day laborer tripping on my property and filing a multi-million dollar lawsuit for permanent injuries, only to settle in his own country with 1/4 million in his back pocket. This happened quite often in the city I worked in.

    For these reasons, if I need help trenching on my property, I'd look in my own neighborhood for a young kid with a strong back, who wants to put a new stereo in his jalopy, or a kid who wants/needs a new bicycle.
     

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