Where can I find this???

Discussion in 'Electrical and Wiring' started by Rockrz, Mar 24, 2013.

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  1. Mar 24, 2013 #1

    Rockrz

    Rockrz

    Rockrz

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    Anybody know where I can find a nice bathroom light fixture that goes above the mirror that has a built in electrical outlet?

    The house we are renting is nice, but it's an older house that has no electrical outlets in the bathroom, so I thought I'd try a light fixture that has one built in.

    I went to Lowes, and they said I should check at Bubba's Mobile Home Supply :rolleyes:
     
  2. Mar 24, 2013 #2

    speedy petey

    speedy petey

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    A) You will not find these any more because installing one will almost certainly create a code violation and quite possibly a safety issue.

    B) You SHOULD NOT be changing fixtures or messing with the electrical in ANY way in a place that you rent.
     
  3. Mar 24, 2013 #3

    Rockrz

    Rockrz

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    My landlord told me I can do anything that increases the value of the home if done at my expense.

    Since modern bathrooms do have electrical outlets, I know having one in the bathroom is not a code violation. So, I'm assuming the issue is having an outlet right above the sink where water is, would be the issue.

    Since I know not to mix water and electricity, I'll probably build a box to mount a row of vanity lights on to and then install the electrical outlet at one end of the box.

    Once it's all sanded and painted, it should look nice once in place. I'll make it long enough so the end of the box is away from the sink.

    Someday when I move, I'll put a plate over the outlet to cover it up so the next tenant won't plug a hair dryer in it and drop it in the sink and kill themselves so I don't get sued in a court of law.

    This arrangement should work out well for all involved.
     
  4. Mar 24, 2013 #4

    speedy petey

    speedy petey

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    I said it on another forum and I will say it here now. You do what you want, you will anyway.
     
  5. Mar 24, 2013 #5

    Rockrz

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    Well, that's true with me, you, everyone...isn't it?
    We're all pretty much going to do what we want to do, which is fine as long as it's not dangerous as to not hurt someone or damage property, right?

    Have electrical plugs in bathrooms been made illegal?

    If I install this, is SWAT gonna raid my place? I hope not, although
    they might if I had a large tank on me toilet :rolleyes:
    (which I'm thinking about doing anyway...)

    I think my plan is doable and it can be done safely.
    All I gotta do when something is plugged in is to make
    sure it doesn't get in the sink whilst the water is running.

    I'll just not run the water anytime I have something
    plugged in to the outlet, and when I move out I'll put
    a plate over the outlet so it's not accessible.

    On this issue, I don't see why I shouldn't... do you
    have a reason why I shouldn't?
     
  6. Mar 24, 2013 #6

    JoeD

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    I don't think the receptacle in the light is a problem but it needs to be a GFCI protected receptacle. So you need to change the breaker (if you have breakers)feeding it to a GFCI.
     
  7. Mar 25, 2013 #7

    Rockrz

    Rockrz

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    Was already planning on that... I was thinking the problem was having an outlet close to the sink and I see them like that all the time, although they are actual wall outlets and are not coming off of the fixture.
     
  8. Mar 25, 2013 #8

    nealtw

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    If you are going to put a gfi breaker in, why not just change the light switch to one that has a outlet attached and fits in the box that is there. As long as the power goes to the switch first.
     
  9. Mar 25, 2013 #9

    Rockrz

    Rockrz

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    Cause the light switch is way over by the shower on the wall when you first walk in and is too far from the counter on the other side of the bathroom where one would likely need an outlet.

    This was why I was looking for a light fixture to put above the mirror that had an outlet built in to it.

    But, I've got an idea of building a box to mount on the wall to hang some vanity lights on the bottom side so I can mount an outlet on the side.

    This way, I'm utilizing the wiring that's already coming out of the wall where the current fixture is without having to run wiring inside the wall to mount an outlet on the wall.

    Long as I'm using the latest technology that meets code requirements, I don't see why this won't work nicely... if I can make it all look decent.
     
  10. Mar 25, 2013 #10

    nealtw

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    If you are not on an outside wall it would be easy enough to fish a wire down to a plug just above the sink in the same stud bay. If you have a vanity you could fish a armored cable down under the vanity and back up beside the sink. They sell boxes to slide into drywall without distroying the wall.
     
  11. Mar 25, 2013 #11

    Rockrz

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    If I'm going to do that, why not just use the wiring that goes to the current fixture?

    I'm not looking for extra work....
     
  12. Mar 25, 2013 #12

    oldognewtrick

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    If you are going to use the wiring on the fixture to feed the plug I see this as a problem, you wern't planning on doing this were you?
     
  13. Mar 25, 2013 #13

    nealtw

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    1. Fish a wire down the wall to a new plug and install an off the shelf light fixture, three hours on a bad day.
    2. Build some kind of box to take a light and and box for an outlet, that may or not be up to code and may have to be removed later, time to complete, unknown.

    I think most of us would just run the wire, but I'm sure you could make a plug work at the light. The improtant part will be the gfi protection.
     
  14. Mar 25, 2013 #14

    Rockrz

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    OK, all of the breakers in the panel are about to be replaced with GFCI protected breakers for safety. That part is a non-issue.


    You'd suggest running a wire from the breaker box, thru the attic, down the wall, just to have a outlet in the wall?

    Why not just run it off of the light fixture and save myself alot of hassle?
    It's going to be GFCI protected, so what would be the problem?

    Granted the outlet will only be live when the light is turned on, but I can live with that.

    And, since it's going to be GFCI protected I don't need to put a plate over it when I move out someday since it will be up to code.
     
  15. Mar 25, 2013 #15

    nealtw

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    I did mean taking it from the light box, somtimes the power goes to the light first so you may be able to get unswitched power there, but switched is fine too.
    Adding a gfi plug to the first plug on each line is preferred over breakers as the gfi can trip and leave the lights on and would likely be cheaper.
    The plug in the bathroom does need to be gfi protected and if the fan or switch is really close to the shower the whole room should be protected.
     
  16. Mar 25, 2013 #16

    Rockrz

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    I'm not only going to install GFCI protected breakers, I'm also going to install GFCI protected wall plugs through out the entire house.

    I was already thinking about this since we are going to be staying there a while and it'll be safer for us while we are there... not to mention earning browning points with the land lady!
     
  17. Mar 25, 2013 #17

    nealtw

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    If you search the net you will find lots of arguements about two gfis affecting each other and at least not needed. If you add one plug, you wire the power to the line side and the other wires to the load side, everything down stream is protected. When ever you can you take lights from the line side so they stay on when the plug trips so sometimes it will take more than one per line. Saving the landlady some money should count for something too.
     
  18. Mar 25, 2013 #18

    CallMeVilla

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    Of course receptacles are legal. Receptacles in light fixtures are no longer allowed. Let's get past that silliness. Since you have the landlord's blessing, do it RIGHT.

    Your best bet is on the side and away from the sink. There is switched power to the existing light. Normally, you do not mix receptacles and lights. I have seen many instances where power was taken from the light switch to the receptacle ... Your light might dim whene a blow drier is turned on ...

    Your best bet is to get power from an adjacent room receptacle and fish the wire into the sink area. If you have no problem with wall repair, you will be in business very soon. Remember -- you MUST have a GFCI to protect the circuit :D

    Bath Receptacle.jpg
     
  19. Mar 25, 2013 #19

    nealtw

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    Villa; The batroom is supposed to be on it's own cercuit. In an older house the closest plug outside the bathroom will likly be on the same cercuit anyway. If he drops into the same bay or goes under the vanity he can use a drop in box, no wall repairs.
     
  20. Mar 25, 2013 #20

    CallMeVilla

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    Yes, Neal, I know that but we are dealing with a newbie and limited grasp of the situation. Can I tell him to run a new circuit back tot he main panel? Doubtful. Will he pop for a pro to do the job? Doubtful.

    How do we help folks like this?
     

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