Wiring a Plasma cutter at 230 volts...

Discussion in 'Electrical and Wiring' started by Delano_man, May 24, 2009.

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  1. May 24, 2009 #1

    Delano_man

    Delano_man

    Delano_man

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    Hi there i just bought a plasma cutter that operates at various different input voltages. These are all selectable by using different jumper placements.

    Input Input Current Recommended
    Voltage Phase @ 6 kw Output Slow-Blow Fuse Size
    208 VAC 1 50 amps 70 amp
    240 VAC 1 43 amps 60 amp
    480 VAC 1 25 amps 35 amp

    There is another model that operates at 200, 230, and 400VAC. My question is can i hook my plasma cutter up to the 230vac on one of these settings? Or do I need something like a Buck transformer. Thanks for any help in advance!
     
  2. May 24, 2009 #2

    speedy petey

    speedy petey

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    Most residential services in the US and Canada are 120/240v, so you would use the 240v setting.

    One thing that confuses me. It says 43 amps at 240v @ 6kW output.
    6kW @ 240v is only about 25 amps. Does this thing have a built-in compressor or something to make the amperage so high?
     
  3. May 24, 2009 #3

    Delano_man

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    It doesn't have a built in compressor. I don't know too much about watts but I am guessing it is a combination between amps drawn at which ever volt... This unit has an output of 50 amps.
     
  4. May 24, 2009 #4

    Delano_man

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    I did test the voltage of my outlet, and it read 230volts at roughly 4pm.
     
  5. May 25, 2009 #5

    speedy petey

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    225-245 is roughly typical residential voltage. Nominal is 240v.

    This is at a residence, right? Or no?
     
  6. May 25, 2009 #6

    Delano_man

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    ok thats what i thought... just don;t wanna blow up my expensive machine. Thanks for the help.
     
  7. May 25, 2009 #7

    dakuda

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    I use a plasma cutter in my garage with 220 without an issue. You should be fine. Just use the right plug.
     
  8. May 25, 2009 #8

    locknut

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    These days I'm not sure what to expect coming out of the outlet and what to call the nominal voltage. For a long time to date I've been reading 124/248V at my service entrance. However, I expect also that this level will drop noticeably during the hot days of summer.
     
  9. May 25, 2009 #9

    speedy petey

    speedy petey

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    But Dakuta, you make it sound like all plasma cutters and all "220" lines are the same, and only the "plug" matters. :confused:

    This could not be more misleading. The circuit ampacity and conductors are the most important thing. Then you have to consider the draw of the tool or appliance. Is it within the limits of the circuit.

    Also you need to consider if it is straight 240v, as in the case of a welder, compressor or most tools. Or is it 120/240v as in the case of a dryer or range.
     
  10. May 25, 2009 #10

    speedy petey

    speedy petey

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    120/240v IS nominal for most residential services int he US and Canada. You will typically see it higher to account for some drop as you correctly state. Mine is usually right where yours is.

    120/240v is what is used for calculation purposes because it is what it is supposed to be.
     
  11. May 26, 2009 #11

    dakuda

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    I assumed that circuit amperage was proper for the tool. You are right, as I should not assume that. I have the advantage of having a 100amp panel in my garage, so I make the circuits to what I need for that particular tool (welder, plasma, etc).
     

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