Wiring / Appliance Question

Discussion in 'Electrical and Wiring' started by neel2004, Apr 22, 2010.

  1. Apr 22, 2010 #1

    neel2004

    neel2004

    neel2004

    New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey all,

    I noticed a few days ago that when I was cooking at my stove (located next to my refrigerator), that I would receive a shock if I leaned an arm on the fridge. I wouldn't get shocked every time, but it did happen enough that it was pretty annoying, and potentially dangerous if touched with a wet hand or wet skin.

    I figured out that the 110v outlet that the fridge was plugged into has a open ground, so I plugged the fridge into another outlet with an extension cord (I know, not the best idea, but it's temporary till I am able to run a new ground wire).

    I haven't been shocked by the fridge since, but I'm not sure if the problem is completely stopped.

    Would the ground fault cause the exterior of the fridge to be electrified, or is there a deeper problem with the fridge wiring?

    Thanks for your help ahead of time.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2010
  2. Apr 22, 2010 #2

    Cork-Guy

    Cork-Guy

    Cork-Guy

    Cork Flooring Pros

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Messages:
    243
    Likes Received:
    0
  3. Apr 22, 2010 #3

    frozenstar

    frozenstar

    frozenstar

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2009
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    0
    dang! I hate that feeling... I hate being grounded by any appliances! :eek:

    Hope you can fix it with Cork-Guy's link...
     
  4. Apr 22, 2010 #4

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

    Well-Known Member Sponsor

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,471
    Likes Received:
    175
    I assume your fridge has a ground pin on its plug?

    Your fridge might be exempted from using a GFCI.

    GFCIs don't get along with motors too well.

    The current that went into you was probably due to the fridge motor windings having a capacitance to the motor housing/fridge shell and may not be strong enough [more than 10 milliamperes] to cause injury.
     
  5. Apr 22, 2010 #5

    kok328

    kok328

    kok328

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    2,755
    Likes Received:
    249
    To the best of my knowledge, all fridges are exempt because if the GFIC trips, you'll loose all your food from spoilage.
     
  6. Apr 23, 2010 #6

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

    Well-Known Member Sponsor

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,471
    Likes Received:
    175
    OK, so fixing the open ground will solve the problem.

    0.1 µF of winding/shell capacitance will put about 5 mA into the ground lead, enough to feel.
     
  7. May 6, 2010 #7

    triple D

    triple D

    triple D

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2008
    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    1
    the only reason the fridge does not have to be gfi is that it is not a counter top plug. you cant get to it when fridge is put in place.
     

Share This Page