workshop lighting, looking for LED with removable/replacable bulbs

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LMHmedchem

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Hello,

I need to replace some old lighting in my workshop and add some additional fixtures. I have changed out some of the old fluorescent bulbs for LED tub lights. This has worked in most cases. I need to add some fixtures in a few places. Some of these will be rather short (1'-2'). I am looking for fixtures with LED bulbs that can be replaced. So many of the LED fixtures are designed to throw away when the bulbs stop working, which is idiotic in my opinion.

I would like bright lights that I can wire to 120v AC. The lights don't need to have their own switch. I suppose I could get some old fashioned fixtures for regular light bulbs and just put LED bulbs in them but I thought I would post and ask what folks here are doing. I am always looking for value, but who isn't.

LMHmedchem
 

Guzzle

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For watchmaking you need 1500 lux of illumination.
Carburetor rebuild, 500.

0ne foot-candle is ~11 lux & the term is obsolete.

With copy paper of known reflectance & a digital camera you can maybe measure the existing illumination level.
 

Sparky617

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kok328

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retrofit the older model fixtures is the way to go.
the big box versions are only good for about a year.
retro with direct wire LED tubes and you won't have to mess with them again.
 

Guzzle

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Just got a 4' LED tube, 1800 lumens, $35, comes with a grounded cord & inline switch & they can be strung together end to end.
Might give me 200 lux, enough to work with a table saw.

"Entrance areas and lobbies require this level of light, and it is also the minimum for a restaurant dining area."
 
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Steve123

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I put in a bunch of T8 sized tubes two years back. I wanted replaceable tubes. There are a few manufacturers of "LED Ready" T8 fixtures, but I found them to be pretty rare, and pretty much junk, mostly sold on Amazon.
Just buy a fluorescent fixture and modify it for LED tubes. I went with Sylvania Double Ended Tubes, 4100K, 17W x 2 per fixture Two foot long tubes are available. If you want shorter than 2 feet, just use a fixture for E26 bulbs.
 

Eddie_T

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For conversion to LED tubes I need to find out what lumen level my eyes are comfortable with. I generally go with considerably less brightness than is recommended.
 

Guzzle

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My rule of thumb for LEDs, per 100 square feet of floor area

Task..\/.............lumens.....watts
woodwork.........3900........40
carb rebuild......9,600.......100
watch making..29,000......300
 

Eddie_T

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I like the same lumens for everything then use a desk lamp for detail work. I just can't think of a low cost way to find find LED conversion tubes that fit my needs. Many people say the recommended replacement is much brighter. The are going to last too long to live with a wrong choice. I don't want to add a dimmer as they annoy me for a simple off/on operation. I guess I could just buy the lowest lumen tube available and exchange it if too low. If it were too bright I would be stuck, or undo the unconversion. Maybe I could add a current limiting resistor.

I tried downloading a lumens app to my wifi smartphone to no avail.
 
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Steve123

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My rule of thumb for LEDs, per 100 square feet of floor area

Task..\/.............lumens.....watts
woodwork.........3900........40
carb rebuild......9,600.......100
watch making..29,000......300

Sounds about right. I got 43 lumens per sq ft in my workshop. Mostly woodworking, but I figure I could rebuild a carb down there too, without straining.
My eyes haven't been good enough for watch-work in maybe 30 years.
But more than just lumens, one also needs to have sufficient fixtures, and arrange the fixtures, so you don't have shadows on your work.
 

Eddie_T

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They're fed by a current source, so no series resistor, proly duty-cycle dimming only.

Maybe soon The HD will sell light meters.
I don't want a light meter.

The answer may be to install a small-cheap chinese LED dimmer in the fixture housing when I do the conversion if too bright. Then I could set it once w/o interfering with the other fixtures on the circuit (and re-adjust it if/as necessary). Depending upon the type of constant current circuitry used just adding a resistor sufficient to dim could change apparent light temperature.
 
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bud16415

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In my workshop all I did and what I would suggest the OP do in his workshop is put up the cheap plastic or porcelain fixtures that take a screw in light bulb. I now buy the LED bulbs that are equal to a 100W for $1. They hang down and throw a great light in all directions and last a long time. I placed mine on about a 6' grid spacing and it is bright.
 

Guzzle

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And you still get more or less uniform lighting. :)

What I seem to prefer is running extension cords vs.
running Romex & mounting boxes.

My 14' x 28' work area has one ceiling center-mounted box so I put another box next to it for outlets. I've lengthened the cords on most of my tools.
 

bud16415

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And you still get more or less uniform lighting. :)

What I seem to prefer is running extension cords vs.
running Romex & mounting boxes.

My 14' x 28' work area has one ceiling center-mounted box so I put another box next to it for outlets. I've lengthened the cords on most of my tools.
I have often thought about the time spent running romex and doing wiring the right way vs the amount it will be used. I had a closet in the bedroom that had no light and someone gave me one of those battery things and I stuck it up and it was a total PITA. First time the batteries wore out I yanked it down went up in the attic found a power source cut a hole mounted a box and installed a proper light. The whole job took about 3 hours and now I turn it on about 5 times a week for less than 30 seconds.

All I know is every time I flip that switch I feel good and I’m glad I did it right.
 

Eddie_T

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I have considered adding a simple wooden rail over my bandsaw, scroll saw, RAS and lathe area and using a couple of these clamp lights as movables. I once saw in a home magazine where they were used to get an industrial look track light in a kitchen.
 

Guzzle

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I am probably abusing the NEC worse than a rented mule.:(

Those ads for batt. operated lights, motion detectors, etc. that you see on TV certainly fool the public.
It's the idea of milliamphours that they don't get & the workmanship for these things is probably terrible.

And those ads for reverse mortgages with Tom Selleck are really offensive. In the first ads he was talking down to us & now he looks so troubled as to why in the world more people are not buying these things.

Both of these are kind of like junk mail. And we pay for our TV service & our junk mail, so why should they stop?
 

PeterMarket

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I have used led bulbs from VONT, and it is still the most practical option for me. I like these bulbs because they have a handy app where I can change the colors in the room without any problems or delays. This is precisely what I was looking for when I was thinking about replacing my old light bulbs to make my home more modern. My wife says that I have succeeded. So I can give you a little recommendation in the person of https://www.amazon.com/smart-light-bulb-bulbs-color/dp/B0922Q43LY/
 
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