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Old 05-06-2017, 01:45 AM  
Mastercarpenty
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Here's the trick from an old hand with trailers. First locate where you want to drill underneath carefully, then cut the covering just enough to insert a 1/2" section of pipe in there. Wiggle that in as you push it upward to the subfloor, then when it hits you stick your drill bit inside the pipe an have at it. Once the hole is in, pull the pipe out, rin the wire/coax, and the insulation will find it's way back to where it belongs. Tape the covering to seal it and you're done.

That plastic undersheeting on trailers is a major design flaw they all have as it traps water leaking from piping, water spilled from inside, and any atmospheric humidity inside the enclosed area. From that the subfloor (which is actually the only floor in trailers) gets damp and fails, the insulation gets wet and becomes ineffective and mildewy, and when enough time passes the floor joists rot. Though it's not a cure for the bad engineering, what I like to do is take a small pen-knife or paring knife and stab holes about every foot over the entire floor area from underneath (dont stab through the ductwork or wiring!). That won't give you any appreciable airflow to help keep the insulation dry, but at least then water won't collect making the problem worse and if you do have a leaking pipe you'll see where it is quickly from the dripping. Plus when you address that leak you won't be dumping several gallons of collected water on yourself trying to access the leak. And you wont find the leak is elsewhere, having run onto and across the undersheet from a dozen or more feet away.

Of course this will void the warranty if it's still in effect but once that time has passed, IMHO this is the one best thing you can do for your trailer to extend it's lifespan and it costs nothing but a little time and a shower afterward.

Phil



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Old 05-06-2017, 02:23 AM  
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Originally Posted by Mastercarpenty View Post
Here's the trick from an old hand with trailers. First locate where you want to drill underneath carefully, then cut the covering just enough to insert a 1/2" section of pipe in there. Wiggle that in as you push it upward to the subfloor, then when it hits you stick your drill bit inside the pipe an have at it. Once the hole is in, pull the pipe out, rin the wire/coax, and the insulation will find it's way back to where it belongs. Tape the covering to seal it and you're done.

That plastic undersheeting on trailers is a major design flaw they all have as it traps water leaking from piping, water spilled from inside, and any atmospheric humidity inside the enclosed area. From that the subfloor (which is actually the only floor in trailers) gets damp and fails, the insulation gets wet and becomes ineffective and mildewy, and when enough time passes the floor joists rot. Though it's not a cure for the bad engineering, what I like to do is take a small pen-knife or paring knife and stab holes about every foot over the entire floor area from underneath (dont stab through the ductwork or wiring!). That won't give you any appreciable airflow to help keep the insulation dry, but at least then water won't collect making the problem worse and if you do have a leaking pipe you'll see where it is quickly from the dripping. Plus when you address that leak you won't be dumping several gallons of collected water on yourself trying to access the leak. And you wont find the leak is elsewhere, having run onto and across the undersheet from a dozen or more feet away.

Of course this will void the warranty if it's still in effect but once that time has passed, IMHO this is the one best thing you can do for your trailer to extend it's lifespan and it costs nothing but a little time and a shower afterward.

Phil
I like that plan.


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Old 05-06-2017, 07:24 AM  
kdrymer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mastercarpenty View Post
Here's the trick from an old hand with trailers. First locate where you want to drill underneath carefully, then cut the covering just enough to insert a 1/2" section of pipe in there. Wiggle that in as you push it upward to the subfloor, then when it hits you stick your drill bit inside the pipe an have at it. Once the hole is in, pull the pipe out, rin the wire/coax, and the insulation will find it's way back to where it belongs. Tape the covering to seal it and you're done.

That plastic undersheeting on trailers is a major design flaw they all have as it traps water leaking from piping, water spilled from inside, and any atmospheric humidity inside the enclosed area. From that the subfloor (which is actually the only floor in trailers) gets damp and fails, the insulation gets wet and becomes ineffective and mildewy, and when enough time passes the floor joists rot. Though it's not a cure for the bad engineering, what I like to do is take a small pen-knife or paring knife and stab holes about every foot over the entire floor area from underneath (dont stab through the ductwork or wiring!). That won't give you any appreciable airflow to help keep the insulation dry, but at least then water won't collect making the problem worse and if you do have a leaking pipe you'll see where it is quickly from the dripping. Plus when you address that leak you won't be dumping several gallons of collected water on yourself trying to access the leak. And you wont find the leak is elsewhere, having run onto and across the undersheet from a dozen or more feet away.

Of course this will void the warranty if it's still in effect but once that time has passed, IMHO this is the one best thing you can do for your trailer to extend it's lifespan and it costs nothing but a little time and a shower afterward.

Phil
Thanks for the suggestion! I will use that method. Since your familiar with these types of homes, do they typically run the electrical wiring anywhere in the insulation cavity below the floor? (I would hope not due to fire risk!) I'm just wondering if there is anything I may encounter while going about this. I know where the marriage wall is at the one end of the home there is electrical cross-over connectors that distribute power to both sides of the home up under the floor near the insulation. The home was built in 2012 if that makes any difference in engineering design.
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Old 05-07-2017, 12:51 AM  
Mastercarpenty
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You'll encounter some wiring in that space, but the pipe trick will let you feel it plus isolate the drill bit from rubbing against it or any water pipes. Once up into the wall there may be wiring so don't over-penetrate with the drill. Same as with houses, wires are normally run via the most direct route, and in the walls the lateral runs are at outlet level so with a little care and common sense you'll be fine.

Phil


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