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Old 05-19-2017, 05:52 PM  
urimak
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Default GFCI for Fridge nearby sink

Hi,
I was wondering if I need a GFCI plug for a fridge which stays by the side of the cabinets . There is about 2 ft of counter top between sink and fridge plug.


If I can , great, if not, what about this scenario:
Can I connect the fridge with same wiring that connect garbage disposal? Different GFCIs but the power comes from the box through the same wiring and then gets spliced between fridge and the disposal. Now there is a 15A circuit breaker. I plan to upgrade it to 20A.

Thx.


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Old 05-19-2017, 06:04 PM  
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If the recp for the refer is also accessible for any countertop appliances, then it must be GFCI protected.

A breaker protects the conductors so, if the conductors are #$14 than the max. breaker is the one there now.


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Old 05-19-2017, 07:04 PM  
urimak
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Thank you. Much appreciated.
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Old 05-19-2017, 09:45 PM  
nealtw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urimak View Post
Thank you. Much appreciated.
Do not change the breaker, the breaker is there to protect the wire and the 15 amp breaker is the limit for 14 g wire.
Just put up with the odd popped breaker, it might be worth a life of a loved one.
Motor in things like fridges don't like gfci because if they pop the fridge no longer runs and may be missed until it is two late.
Just change the outlet to a single plug so nothing else is used at that outlet.

See # 8201-4 on this page.
http://www.internationalconfig.com/c...ages/pg155.pdf
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Old 05-20-2017, 08:20 AM  
Kabris
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According to Code, all outlets in a damp location or within 6 feet of a sink basin shall be GFCI protected. However, I rarely put a refrigerator on a GFCI, mainly because they tend to nuisance trip over motor loads.

Technically a sump pump in a basement needs to be GFCI protected also. Personally that's something I wouldn't want to nuisance trip.
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Old 05-20-2017, 12:11 PM  
afjes_2016
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Agree with others. Best is to replace duplex receptacle with a single 15amp receptacle where you have the fridge plugged into now. Does not have to be GFCI because there will only be one receptacle and it will be used only for the fridge. Totally code compliant-No. But if you know no one in the house will unplug the fridge and plug in something else then don't worry too much. The GFCI is for personal safety. If you go to sell your house then the inspector for the buyer may say something. Or just go and replace the receptacle with a GFCI receptacle but as stated GFCI don't really like motor loads that much, especially if it is an older fridge.

Do not upgrade a 15 amp breaker with a 20amp breaker. You are asking for problems in the future. If there is a 15amp breaker there now it means there is only 14 gauge conductors. Connecting the fridge to the disposal may present problems of over loading the circuit and tripping the breaker.

The other thing you may want to do is with the present fridge receptacle. Push the "Test" buttons on all the GFCIs that are in the kitchen now. Leave the fridge door open and see if when you press the test button if the fridge shuts off. This will answer your question. It may already be on a GFCI protected circuit that is connected to one of your small appliance circuits on the kitchen counter/s.


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If at any time you do not feel confident enough to perform a trouble shooting method that I suggest or feel you may not have the experience or comfort level to do so please ask questions before proceeding.
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