DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Plumbing Forum > Improper plumbing & trying to remodel bathroom/laundry




Help Support House Repair Talk by donating using the link above.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-30-2018, 09:50 AM  
zannej
Senior Member
 
zannej's Avatar
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,516
Liked 519 Times on 377 Posts
Likes Given: 3078

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nealtw View Post
Put in stackables and you have room for sink and cupboards.
Our washer and dryer doors open the wrong way, can't say you get over the upset, but after while you just quit complaining
In new construction it just goes in the best for the plumbing, like ours.

You can still put the plumbing next to the shower, the hoses will reach.
We'd lose the pedestals if we stacked-- and trying to stack them would be a nightmare. LOL. I like the levels they are at with the pedestals because they aren't too low or too high.

We already have plumbing from the lavatory right near where the washer would go. The outlet for the dryer is already closer to where the dryer would go, although, the washing machine will be closer to the outlet box so moving the outlet while the walls are down and floors are torn up might not be as hard to do. It's just that it tends to be more convenient to have the washing machine right next to the door because it's fewer steps to walk if we rinse something outside with the hose-- although we are thinking of putting in a small deck back there with an awning over the door.

I think I would move the outlet for the washing machine or make a new one-- I need to do some work on the circuit box and get some new things in there and add a whole house surge protector somehow.

I finally got my brother to look at my sketches and he loved the idea (and he liked having the washing machine right next to the door). He did ask if it would be possible to add access to the bathroom straight from his room, but I explained how awkward that would be (and that I had played around with layouts that did that) and showed him how it would not work out well-- plus his bedroom wall is a load-bearing one. But he loved the idea of being able to walk out his door straight to the washer & dryer and just going around the corner to the bathroom. He's on board with helping me with the project now and said he'll even give me a little extra money on top of what he owes me for the loan to help pay for it.

Edit: I forgot to mention that on the south wall of the laundry room I plan to have a small sort of murphy table that folds down from the wall and lets us put laundry on it-- also thinking of having a fold down drying rack for stuff that can't be put in the dryer or that the dryer doesn't get completely dry. That is another reason why I wanted the dryer in that location-- it's closer to the folding area.

Here is a general sketch of the layout. I probably forgot stuff in the sketch... (I apparently forgot the toilet in the first version-- I've rectified that). What do you think?


Click image for larger version

Name:	tumblr_p3ds1lkCxy1qkwd9ao1_1280.png
Views:	23
Size:	146.5 KB
ID:	18663  

Last edited by zannej; 01-30-2018 at 12:18 PM.
zannej is offline  
nealtw Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2018, 12:21 PM  
zannej
Senior Member
 
zannej's Avatar
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,516
Liked 519 Times on 377 Posts
Likes Given: 3078

Default

I know I keep replying to my own post. LOL.
I started thinking (again) about my material list. With my room measurements I did the math to figure out what I would need for the flooring. Since there will be water and chances for spills (from washing machine & bathtub) and because of the humidity in the area, I want to go with pressure treated lumber.

I figure I need about four 3/4" 8x4 (or eight 3/4" 4x4) sheets and the same number of 1/4" sheets. I'm currently trying to figure out what I need for extra joist support (I want to make sure I have support at the edges in case there are no joists sticking out from under the perimeter walls). I've read that I can use either 2x8s or 2x10s. I was thinking for under the washing machine the 2x10s might work (or is that not necessary)? That will help me determine what joist hangers I will need.

I might temporarily take down the wall between the bathroom and laundry room (the one with the main vent stack) while I do the floor-- if it turns out to be feasible to do so.

I'm going to attempt to get the joists set up so the floor will be level. For any issues with floor seams, I am thinking of using drywall tape and mud/spackle or whatever it is so the surface will be smooth and not create bumps under the vinyl sheet.

I'm still trying to pick out some vinyl sheet-- I'll likely get some from either surplus warehouse or HD or Lowes. Stuff in the bathroom will be cheaper but I want to get something sturdy for the laundry room. I wanted to get Lifeproof Aged Birch, but it's not available in store and can't be shipped to me.


zannej is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2018, 12:46 PM  
nealtw
Contractor retired
 
nealtw's Avatar
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Upper Fraser Valley, British Columbia
Posts: 23,705
Liked 3051 Times on 2671 Posts
Likes Given: 5038

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by zannej View Post
I know I keep replying to my own post. LOL.
I started thinking (again) about my material list. With my room measurements I did the math to figure out what I would need for the flooring. Since there will be water and chances for spills (from washing machine & bathtub) and because of the humidity in the area, I want to go with pressure treated lumber.

I figure I need about four 3/4" 8x4 (or eight 3/4" 4x4) sheets and the same number of 1/4" sheets. I'm currently trying to figure out what I need for extra joist support (I want to make sure I have support at the edges in case there are no joists sticking out from under the perimeter walls). I've read that I can use either 2x8s or 2x10s. I was thinking for under the washing machine the 2x10s might work (or is that not necessary)? That will help me determine what joist hangers I will need.

I might temporarily take down the wall between the bathroom and laundry room (the one with the main vent stack) while I do the floor-- if it turns out to be feasible to do so.

I'm going to attempt to get the joists set up so the floor will be level. For any issues with floor seams, I am thinking of using drywall tape and mud/spackle or whatever it is so the surface will be smooth and not create bumps under the vinyl sheet.

I'm still trying to pick out some vinyl sheet-- I'll likely get some from either surplus warehouse or HD or Lowes. Stuff in the bathroom will be cheaper but I want to get something sturdy for the laundry room. I wanted to get Lifeproof Aged Birch, but it's not available in store and can't be shipped to me.
You don't need pressure treated anything unless you want to keep insects out of stuff under the house but the rest of the house is not treated so mostly pointless.
You match the joists size to what you have. And you buy hangers to fit that size of joist..
subfloor want to match the thickness of the subfloor throughout the house if you can.
We like to use tongue and groove plywood for big areas, if not you will have to put blocks under the joints between the joists where the sheets meet.
That is just so if one bends it wants the other to bend with it or stop the bend entirely.
nealtw is online now  
zannej Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2018, 10:13 PM  
zannej
Senior Member
 
zannej's Avatar
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,516
Liked 519 Times on 377 Posts
Likes Given: 3078

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nealtw View Post
You don't need pressure treated anything unless you want to keep insects out of stuff under the house but the rest of the house is not treated so mostly pointless.
You match the joists size to what you have. And you buy hangers to fit that size of joist..
subfloor want to match the thickness of the subfloor throughout the house if you can.
We like to use tongue and groove plywood for big areas, if not you will have to put blocks under the joints between the joists where the sheets meet.
That is just so if one bends it wants the other to bend with it or stop the bend entirely.
I believe that at least some of wood for the house is pressure treated and bugs are an issue. We have carpenter bees that like to bore in to things.
I wanted to get the tongue-and-groove plywood, but it's not listed as being available in my area. So, I was planning to make sure I have reinforcement under all of the joints.
I need to measure the joists to figure out the size. From the photos under the house I can't really tell.
I still need to cut a hole somewhere to figure out the thickness of the existing plywood.
zannej is offline  
nealtw Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2018, 10:13 PM  
zannej
Senior Member
 
zannej's Avatar
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,516
Liked 519 Times on 377 Posts
Likes Given: 3078

Default

So, I've been discussing the subfloor options on the flooring forum and I think I've picked what boards to use (at least for subfloor).
23/32 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. RTD Sheathing Syp
It's only 1/32" off from being 3/4".
They didn't have the treated ones available to my area and I found some ones rated to work as floors (they don't show the brand, but I believe they are Plytanium and should be CAT P1-09 or something like that). They do have that same thickness board in tongue-and-groove, but I didn't want to pay $6 more per board just for that.

For the top layer, I am waiting to find out what the current floor thickness is so I can try to match it, so I will have to wait for warmer weather to go poking around. I also found out that I will need to stagger the top layer so the seams do not line up with the seams on the subfloor.

The thinnest one I found is 11/32 in. x 4 ft. x 8 ft. Rtd Southern Yellow Pine Plywood Sheathing. It's more than 1/4" thick so it would likely be sturdy enough.
I'm hoping that thickness will suffice since it's less expensive than the thicker ones.

I figure I could use Thompson's wood sealant on the subfloor boards but I would probably just leave the 2nd layer as is. Then I could put looselay vinyl sheet down on top.

The plan is to do things in stages. First I will tear out the current bathroom, floors and all. Get plumbing roughed in, vent hole cut in exterior wall, adjust the doorway to the new bathroom (bumping it over about 3" to 4" so the doorknob won't hit the wall when door swings in), adjust/run electrical for the new laundry room, paint the walls/replace wall panels, do the floor, and install the new door. Then I will move the laundry appliances and stuff in to the mostly finished space and then repeat the process with the new bathroom.


zannej is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter DIY Home Repair Forum Replies Last Post
Bathroom Remodel dieball General Home Improvement Discussion 3 02-17-2013 10:08 PM
Laundry Room Remodel Zachary General Home Improvement Discussion 7 04-20-2011 03:13 AM
removing/replacing 2x4 in bathroom/laundry shan2themax Walls and Ceilings 1 01-09-2010 08:06 PM
Shared plumbing between laundry room and bathroom - trouble? jmyyz Plumbing Forum 6 11-12-2009 09:10 PM
Bathroom Remodel Vikeologist Walls and Ceilings 9 11-07-2009 08:42 AM



Newest Threads