DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Framing and Foundation > saving wood framing in a basement




Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-18-2011, 09:49 PM  
slownsteady
Supporting Member
HRT_SUPPORTER.png
 
slownsteady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Newton, NJ
Posts: 1,422
Liked 224 Times on 188 Posts
Likes Given: 278

Default saving wood framing in a basement

A while back, i stripped down a basement wall where I was getting water. We managed to stop the water through extensive outside waterproofing and the wall has dried and remains stone-dry for a while now.

Here's the question: I don't really want to take down the 20 ft.-plus of wood framing that is in good condition. But I don't want to just cover up the studs because moisture can still be a problem in the future. Is there any kind of treatment or coating that I can apply to the wood framing to make it withstand any moisture? I'm imagining some kind of spray-on plastic coating that would protect the wood and allow me to go forward on the basement without reframing this wall.



__________________
slownsteady is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-18-2011, 10:21 PM  
nealtw
Contractor
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: vancouver, b.c.
Posts: 10,980
Liked 964 Times on 857 Posts
Likes Given: 1650

Default

If you are going to apply a vapour barrier between studs and drywall you can consider your wall outside. Treat it with the same stuff as treated lumber has. You can buy it by the gallon and it kills left over mold spores. Our inspecters call for it even inside if there has been mold in the area.



__________________
nealtw is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-19-2011, 02:23 PM  
slownsteady
Supporting Member
HRT_SUPPORTER.png
 
slownsteady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Newton, NJ
Posts: 1,422
Liked 224 Times on 188 Posts
Likes Given: 278

Default

So, if I understand this right, I can treat the wood as long as I put the vapor barrier on this side of the living space.
Does this cause problems with trapping moisture in the empty space between the studs, or with any insulation I should use? I imagine fiberglass is not an option with this setup.

__________________
slownsteady is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-19-2011, 03:17 PM  
nealtw
Contractor
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: vancouver, b.c.
Posts: 10,980
Liked 964 Times on 857 Posts
Likes Given: 1650

Default

In a cold zone like we are in the poly is required and with that all air is stopped at the barrier and venting is required on the outside wall to allow moisture out. It's not a matter of if but when it get wet back there. Older houses that were sheeted with shiplap have lots of holes, we drill holes in plywood sheeting. In an underground basement we install fresh air vents, it all code here.
You should talk to local city building inspectors for what is best in your area.

__________________
nealtw is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter DIY Home Repair Forum Replies Last Post
wood treatment for framing metricus Framing and Foundation 2 04-17-2011 07:41 PM
Framing using metal track and wood studs is OK? drpwong Framing and Foundation 2 02-05-2010 08:42 AM
basement framing mgoblue24 Framing and Foundation 4 01-23-2010 03:47 PM
Framing basement matt s Carpentry and Woodworking 3 11-27-2009 09:10 PM

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS