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Old 11-22-2013, 04:23 PM  
Brinybay
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Default Repairing exterior wall plugs after insulation.

We recently had blow-in insulation installed in our walls from the exterior. They drilled 2-inch holes and after blowing in the insulation, plugged them with wooden plugs and plastered them over. I understood that it's my responsibility to sand the plugs and repaint them.

My question is the best way to do this. How much sanding is needed, and what type of sandpaper should I use? Some of the siding planks looked like they were cracked in the process, should those be replaced, or are they ok? The house is double-sided, so there's another layer of siding underneath. Also, the plaster in one of the plugs is still soft to the touch after almost a week, should that be a concern?


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Old 11-22-2013, 06:28 PM  
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My opinion,
Those pieces of siding should have been removed, and then the holes drilled through the sheathing boards underneath. This is not, the usual install.
What you need to do now, is to slide a piece of metal flashing under the holes in the siding from underneath, then you can put some filler in to seal the holes, or cut those plugs down to a thinner size.Those plugs they put in work, but only when they are installed in the holes under the siding.
Hope this makes sense,
Sorry you got a sub par job,Good luck


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Old 11-23-2013, 04:34 AM  
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My opinion,
Those pieces of siding should have been removed, and then the holes drilled through the sheathing boards underneath. This is not, the usual install.
What you need to do now, is to slide a piece of metal flashing under the holes in the siding from underneath, then you can put some filler in to seal the holes, or cut those plugs down to a thinner size.Those plugs they put in work, but only when they are installed in the holes under the siding.
Hope this makes sense,
Sorry you got a sub par job,Good luck
Hmm, quotes from 2 insulation companies (both of otherwise good reput) indicated they were going to drill through both layers of siding. I made it clear there were 2 layers, the original siding and the current siding that was installed over it (long before we owned the house).

I'm not much of a handyman, so I'm wondering how difficult it is to do the fix you mentioned. I would rather hire somebody who knows what they're doing and have it done right rather than risk screwing it up and getting frustrated. We had our bathroom remodeled just last August, I could ask the contractor to come give me a bid on fixing this.

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Old 11-23-2013, 08:44 AM  
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Just because they say they are reputable...doesn't fix your future wet insulation you paid good money for.
A good idea would be to contact a real contractor that does siding repairs like the ones I suggested.
I just see so many installs done wrong to start...it's hard to keep up somedays.
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Old 11-24-2013, 12:19 PM  
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Just because they say they are reputable...doesn't fix your future wet insulation you paid good money for.
A good idea would be to contact a real contractor that does siding repairs like the ones I suggested.
I just see so many installs done wrong to start...it's hard to keep up somedays.
They had good grades on Angie's List, so now I question that source. I've found a contractor who does siding, I'll run it by him.
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Old 11-24-2013, 12:49 PM  
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I'm in the roofing business and it's surprising, some of the local contractors that get good reviews from Angie's list and even the better business bureau are the ones who have troublemaker paying their bills at the supply house and have a multitude of problems with workmanship issues. I always suggest to customers to check references with installations and also call the supply house where they get material and see how they pay their bills.

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Old 11-24-2013, 05:35 PM  
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I would use a random orbit sander, like the one made by Makita - see pic at http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...pL._SX425_.jpg
I had a bunch of repairs on hardboard siding when I had to retrofit in some old with new. I used a sandable water-based exterior wood filler as well to fill in any grooves or cracks and sanded level with this type of sander. Then I primed with an oil based exterior primer and painted with exterior latex. Looks like you will have to do a bunch more filling to get this surface level - better get an extra large container of wood filler.
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Old 11-24-2013, 09:29 PM  
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Siding hardly ever stops all the water from getting in, the house wrap or tar paper are there as a secondery water stop and in this case with another siding behind there was three items to stop the water. Now that he has drilled thru all layers of protection, any water getting in this area will have no trouble finding it's way into the structure. As was mentioned this peice of siding should just be replaced and it should have been removed in the first place.
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Old 11-25-2013, 03:07 AM  
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I would use a random orbit sander, like the one made by Makita - see pic at http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...pL._SX425_.jpg
I had a bunch of repairs on hardboard siding when I had to retrofit in some old with new. I used a sandable water-based exterior wood filler as well to fill in any grooves or cracks and sanded level with this type of sander. Then I primed with an oil based exterior primer and painted with exterior latex. Looks like you will have to do a bunch more filling to get this surface level - better get an extra large container of wood filler.
The boards that are cracked like the one in the picture I may just have replaced, there's only a couple of them that are like that. Maybe Santa will bring me an orbit sander.

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Old 11-25-2013, 07:08 AM  
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I agree with what Drywallinfo suggests and I bought a (mouse sander) a couple years ago and really love it for this kind of work also. It’s more aggressive than I thought it would be. You might want to check them out also on your Xmas list. The nose lets you work in corners pretty well.

Both types are nice tools and maybe one of each this year with the money you will save doing it DIY.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/10779765?w...ctedSellerId=3


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