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Old 01-09-2014, 08:35 PM  
Wuzzat?
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of a 120v incand. bulb exploding if you put it across 240v?

Anybody?



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Old 01-09-2014, 08:39 PM  
Blue Jay
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Good chance it could, don't think I will try it to check out. By the way it won't stay lit very long, about like a flash bulb.



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Old 01-09-2014, 09:30 PM  
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They can explode for any number of reasons, I would not try this, you are just pushing your luck.
https://www.google.ca/#q=why+do+light+bulbs+explode

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Old 01-10-2014, 06:19 AM  
bud16415
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I have seen 120v bulbs subjected to 220 on several occasions. They normally come on super bright and burn out in less than 10 seconds very much like a flash bulb. The bulb is designed inside very much like a high voltage standoff and the path to reinitiate the arc would take much more potential than the 220 applied so in that regard it “should” be self-extinguishing.

That still doesn’t mean I would want to be hanging onto one when it happened. When things flash and pop people react and those reactions are not thought thru or planned. The last thing you want when working with potentially deadly things is to be having involuntary reactions.

The odd of it exploding in the classic mode of explosion is really quite low I would expect.

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Old 01-10-2014, 06:38 AM  
speedy petey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bud16415 View Post
I have seen 120v bulbs subjected to 220 on several occasions. They normally come on super bright and burn out in less than 10 seconds very much like a flash bulb. The bulb is designed inside very much like a high voltage standoff and the path to reinitiate the arc would take much more potential than the 220 applied so in that regard it “should” be self-extinguishing.

That still doesn’t mean I would want to be hanging onto one when it happened. When things flash and pop people react and those reactions are not thought thru or planned. The last thing you want when working with potentially deadly things is to be having involuntary reactions.

The odd of it exploding in the classic mode of explosion is really quite low I would expect.
This. Exactly this.
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Old 01-10-2014, 06:50 AM  
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Thanks, folks. . .I wear glasses so I may have gotten offhand about stuff flying into my face.

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Old 01-10-2014, 08:11 AM  
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I might add to my comments above are based around the disappearing incandescent bulb. Try this with a CFL bulb and all bets are off and more than likely you will get an explosion in the classic mode complete with fire and smoke. Also mercury gas I would guess.

Below is a link with some video of them exploding so you won’t have to try it to see what happens.

http://wattsupwiththat.com/2011/04/2...bulbs-explode/

One thing I don’t think many people realize about the new CFL bulbs is they don’t like dimmer circuits. Some bulbs are designed to work with a dimmer but most are not. The print on the side of the package will tell you if they can be used.



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