DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Electrical and Wiring > replacing plug fuse




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Old 07-01-2014, 11:14 AM  
bud16415
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Can you take a photo of the breaker box with the door open. The idea of main fuses or main breakers is they control the sum of all the individual breaker loads when combined. What you have then is a 60 amp circuit to your house. The questions are then do you have main breakers on the breaker panel and what is wrong with having belt and suspenders as to protection.

You never said I don’t believe what it is about the fuses you didn’t like or why you want to take them out of the circuit.

As a side note the fuses now protect you from the point where the power enters your house to the location of the breaker panel. If that wire were to become damaged you would have full power into your house from back on the pole where there should be some really major fuses.



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Old 07-02-2014, 10:33 PM  
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There is no main breaker in the breaker panel.

I want to take the fuse box out of the equation because I don't want to routinely replace fuses. I started blowing fuses one day and it became a hassle to replace them. I prefer to have the breaker trip, which can be reset, vs having to buy and install a one time use fuse.


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Old 07-02-2014, 11:10 PM  
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Apply for a permit, they will let you now in short order what should be done.
No one here should agree to anything that could put you, your family , your house and your insurance in danger.
You obviously need more than a thirty amp service but why did some one set it up that way. And if we think he didn't know any better, that just brings up more questions on what else he has done.
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Old 07-03-2014, 05:34 AM  
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That is even more reason to not crowbar those fuses. The wire coming into your house way back when was sized to be a 60 amp circuit. That was common back in the day when no one had much use for electricity past one light bulb in each room and a radio sitting in the living room and a new invention called a fridge in the kitchen. Now we suck power in many more ways and home services are 200 amp.

The idea of a main is it protects everything and the power coming in is not to exceed what the main will allow. Just because you can add all those individual breakers up and get some high number that doesn’t mean your house feed will handle that. Once the sum of whatever is running gets to 30 amps on one of the two legs feeding your house you need to blow that fuse or risk melting wires and burning your house down.

What you really need is a new service installed with a new panel that has a main breaker built in and sized to your requirements.

On edit:

To try and explain this another way it’s like you have a supply line for your water coming into your house that is ľ inch and right after it enters the house you tee it off into twelve, ĺ inch pipes and expect each of those pipes to flow full streams of water. I think you can see they would just trickle.

The difference is with electricity it will keep trying to supply the demand and unlike water will not be self-regulating the power supply at the pole is massive and will cram power into a wire to supply the demand until something gives. In your case what is giving is the fuses if the fuses are not there the thing that will give is the wire. Wires have resistance and resistance produces heat and heat causes fire. The idea behind it all is to stay within the safe limits of the wire, and in your case that’s 30 amps per wire coming into your house. Your oven alone is on a 30 amp breaker. So you have to update or you have to learn to manage your power requirements. Updating is the correct thing to do and have it done to code and inspected. The absolute wrong thing to do is to jumper the only thing that’s protecting you now.

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Old 07-03-2014, 10:22 AM  
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Originally Posted by bud16415 View Post
That is even more reason to not crowbar those fuses. The wire coming into your house way back when was sized to be a 60 amp circuit. That was common back in the day when no one had much use for electricity past one light bulb in each room and a radio sitting in the living room and a new invention called a fridge in the kitchen. Now we suck power in many more ways and home services are 200 amp.

The idea of a main is it protects everything and the power coming in is not to exceed what the main will allow. Just because you can add all those individual breakers up and get some high number that doesnít mean your house feed will handle that. Once the sum of whatever is running gets to 30 amps on one of the two legs feeding your house you need to blow that fuse or risk melting wires and burning your house down.

What you really need is a new service installed with a new panel that has a main breaker built in and sized to your requirements.

On edit:

To try and explain this another way itís like you have a supply line for your water coming into your house that is ľ inch and right after it enters the house you tee it off into twelve, ĺ inch pipes and expect each of those pipes to flow full streams of water. I think you can see they would just trickle.

The difference is with electricity it will keep trying to supply the demand and unlike water will not be self-regulating the power supply at the pole is massive and will cram power into a wire to supply the demand until something gives. In your case what is giving is the fuses if the fuses are not there the thing that will give is the wire. Wires have resistance and resistance produces heat and heat causes fire. The idea behind it all is to stay within the safe limits of the wire, and in your case thatís 30 amps per wire coming into your house. Your oven alone is on a 30 amp breaker. So you have to update or you have to learn to manage your power requirements. Updating is the correct thing to do and have it done to code and inspected. The absolute wrong thing to do is to jumper the only thing thatís protecting you now.
Thanks for the info. Ok, guess looks like it's going to be a contracted/major infrastructure upgrade. Hmm, maybe time to move. But my take away is that this isn't a simple "short the box" fix isn't the way to go.
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Old 07-03-2014, 10:58 AM  
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I don’t know what it’s like in San Francisco (although I suspect it’s the same or more strict than here). I spent last weekend helping a friend make updates required to sell his house in the Cleveland Ohio area. He had only lived there 3 years and had a home inspection done prior to him buying the house. It was a pretty quick sale with the contingency of a home inspection by the buyer and one by the financing office and another by the town of Cleveland. The stuff that was on the lists was unbelievable. All items that were not an issue 3 years before.

I don’t know how long you have owned your home but my guess is to sell it the electrical service would have to be updated. If not and provisions were made to sell “as is” you will be taking a big hit for unknown items.

We bought an “as is” short sale house last year from a bank and they didn’t want to mess around with trying to maximize their profits or in this case minimize their losses. They could have easily spent 20k and increased the selling price by 50k. I would say bite the bullet and do it right now and have the benefits all along and sell when you are ready to and when the market is right.
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Old 07-03-2014, 12:44 PM  
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Originally Posted by bud16415 View Post
I donít know what itís like in San Francisco (although I suspect itís the same or more strict than here). I spent last weekend helping a friend make updates required to sell his house in the Cleveland Ohio area. He had only lived there 3 years and had a home inspection done prior to him buying the house. It was a pretty quick sale with the contingency of a home inspection by the buyer and one by the financing office and another by the town of Cleveland. The stuff that was on the lists was unbelievable. All items that were not an issue 3 years before.

I donít know how long you have owned your home but my guess is to sell it the electrical service would have to be updated. If not and provisions were made to sell ďas isĒ you will be taking a big hit for unknown items.

We bought an ďas isĒ short sale house last year from a bank and they didnít want to mess around with trying to maximize their profits or in this case minimize their losses. They could have easily spent 20k and increased the selling price by 50k. I would say bite the bullet and do it right now and have the benefits all along and sell when you are ready to and when the market is right.
The market is pretty nuts here. The seller holds the most power as all types of buyers are coming in: all cash, no contingency, etc. I got lucky where most of my stuff was ok. The home inspector did note that the fuse rating is low by current standards, but par for my block. I guess I'm going to chalk this up as "nice to have" for now.


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