DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Carpentry and Woodworking > how do you repair a doorknob hole?




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Old 11-12-2009, 10:22 PM  
diyonthefly
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Default how do you repair a doorknob hole?

Been searching over the internet for an answer to this question and so far haven't found much. The doorknob hole of my door is damaged so that when you put the doorknob in there is a gap that you can see through. I have researched the internet and Bondo seems like a possible solution to fill in the space. Since I am doing this work to an interior door, I am concerned about the fumes and I've never worked with Bondo before. Any suggestions.



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Old 11-13-2009, 12:30 PM  
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DIY on the fly:

You can patch the old with Bondo, or you can use an two part epoxy meant for wood repair, or you can replace the door, or you can plug the hole with an old sock. There's a gazillion things you CAN do.

But, if it wuz me, I'd just put an escutcheon plate on both sides of the door.

If it's a common lock like Weiser or Schlage, then you can buy "escutcheon plates" in both square and round styles that you can put on either side (or both sides) of the door knob at your local hardware store or home center. If it's not a Weiser or a Schlage, then you can get other escutcheon plates in other sizes, and your local locksmith would know where to get them from. If push comes to shove, you could probably order a couple of large brass washers from any place in your yellow pages that sells fasteners and have it machined at your local trade school to fit.



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Old 11-13-2009, 08:04 PM  
diyonthefly
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Thanks. I never heard of an escutcheon plate before. i failed to mention that this is a white bedroom door. also the gap goes to the wood frame part of the door. will a plate look ok? i could probably put a plate on the door and put some white epoxy at the edge where the veneer got knocked off. I have Devcon 2 ton white epoxy. That's sounds like it would work to cover the area where the plate doesn't and i won't have to paint over it. i have a Penn Reading standard doorknob fits 2-3/8" and 2-3/4" backset. Please comment. Thanks so much for the reply.

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Old 11-23-2009, 01:29 AM  
ljohnson
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Default similar problem

I have a similar problem. I was trying to install an actual door knob in some french doors that were 'pop-out' doors. Unfortunately, I didn't measure correctly, and ended up drilling the hole about a quarter inch to the left. Now, when I install the latch, the door knob will not thread through the hole in the latch. So, I have to drill some more to the right, but there will definitely be a gap that I'm not sure how to cover up. Any ideas?

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Old 11-23-2009, 08:52 PM  
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LJohnson:

The Weiser escutcheon plate I referred Diyonthefly to are 2 1/2 inches ID and 3 3/4 inches OD, so they will cover the wood for a full 5/8 inches around the hole. You should have no trouble hiding a 1/4 inch gap with a pair of them. They are Weiser Part # 1639 and you should be able to order them from Weiser at most hardware store, or at any locksmith. So, if you just install a Weiser set, a pair of Weiser 1639 escutcheons should cover the gap if you drill a new hole.

Not sure if I answered your question, but it seems to me that if you use an escutcheon on both sides of the door, the gap will be hidden.

You can also get larger and smaller escutcheons for other brands of locks as well, such as Schlage, Medico, Kwikset, etc. in different styles and finishes.

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Old 11-23-2009, 08:58 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diyonthefly View Post
Thanks. I never heard of an escutcheon plate before. i failed to mention that this is a white bedroom door. also the gap goes to the wood frame part of the door. will a plate look ok? i could probably put a plate on the door and put some white epoxy at the edge where the veneer got knocked off. I have Devcon 2 ton white epoxy. That's sounds like it would work to cover the area where the plate doesn't and i won't have to paint over it. i have a Penn Reading standard doorknob fits 2-3/8" and 2-3/4" backset. Please comment. Thanks so much for the reply.
You CAN use epoxy to fill a gap in a wood door. However, I think something like water putty (which you can buy at any hardware store) would be a little more user friendly. Basically, you just mix some water putty powder into a bit of water, and then spread it into the gap you want to fill with a putty knife. If you've ever seen plywood, you've seen football shaped voids in it wherever there was a knot or void that have been filled. It's water putty they use to fill those football shaped patches. Water putty is reasonably strong and hard, sandable, paintable, and sticks well to wood.

I would use water putty to fill your gap, sand smooth and paint, and then decide if you need the escutcheon any more.
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Old 11-24-2009, 06:28 PM  
diyonthefly
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here's what i tried and how it turned out so far.

tried using epoxy and found the consistency to thin to built up much of a layer. Also left a crappy bumpy finish which didn't exactly feel hard.

then i put some "wood putty" in the hole and it was hard enough to build up a layer to cover the gap when i put the doorknob in. however, after 2 days it stilll hasn't hardened. ie. i can still press my finger into it. The stuff is actually called "painter's putty".

i should be able to tighten up the doorknob so that there will enough grip on the door that it won't slip. the putty covers the hole and maybe i paint it a bit.

next time i will try Bondo or invest in a plate.

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Old 11-24-2009, 08:53 PM  
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I've never heard of either "Wood Putty" or "Painter's Putty", but from their names, I expect they're both what I would call "Glazing Putty".

I've heard of Glazing Putty, Plumber's Putty and Water Putty. Water putty is the only one that you mix with water and it's the only one to dry hard within a day or two. Water putty is the only "putty" I've ever heard of that you mix with water.

Glazing putty is nothing more than clay mixed with linseed oil, and it will eventually harden up, but it takes a long time. Plumber's putty is the same thing, only it's clay mixed with a non-drying oil.

G'Luck with your repair anyhow.

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Old 11-25-2009, 09:42 PM  
diyonthefly
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DAP Products - Repair Products - DAP® Painter's Putty '53' ®
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Old 11-25-2009, 11:05 PM  
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"DAP Painter's Putty 53" is ordinary glazing putty with some titanium dioxide tossed in to make it whiter.

Click on one of the MSDS links and you'll find the stuff is made up mostly of linseed oil and calcium carbonate. When calcium carbonate ("Tums") occurs naturally, it's called "chaulk" or "limestone". The fact that they say that it contains 60 to 100 percent "limestone" means that they ground up natural limestone to make the stuff, rather than use pure food grade calcium carbonate.

It's the same stuff as glazing putty (with the addition of a small amount of titanium oxide to make it whiter) being sold under the name "Painter's Putty". Most people won't know what you mean by "Painter's putty", so just tell them it's glazing putty being sold under a different name.



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