Understanding Air Conditioning Efficiency

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nobes

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Hey everyone,

I've been pondering a question about air conditioning efficiency and thought this would be the perfect place to seek some insights.

How much impact do regular maintenance and filter replacements have on the overall efficiency of an air conditioning unit?

I've heard conflicting opinions, and I'm curious to know about your experiences.

Additionally, any tips on DIY maintenance or signs that it's time to call in a professional would be greatly appreciated.
 
Hey everyone,

I've been pondering a question about air conditioning efficiency and thought this would be the perfect place to seek some insights.

How much impact do regular maintenance and filter replacements have on the overall efficiency of an air conditioning unit?

I've heard conflicting opinions, and I'm curious to know about your experiences.

Additionally, any tips on DIY maintenance or signs that it's time to call in a professional would be greatly appreciated. https://everesthvac.net/
thanks in advance for any help
 
Good day. I'm only a person and not a professional. I have found on my heaters that the filters do need to change a few times a year so the air can flow through them. It the air cannot get though it will cause the heater to pull harder. This is just the stuff I've learned when my heater would be checked.

I'm sure a professional or a more experienced person will chime in soon.
 
My advice is to call out a professional just one time. Then, once they arrive, follow them to pick up any tips on how they do it. In my area, a once a year check up costs around $70, and money well spent.
Dont forget to make sure your condensate line is free flowing, which may include flushing the line. As far as filters are concerned, i replace them twice a year, spring and fall.
 
One last thing, when purchasing filters, you will have many choices. Unless you have a high output A/C unit, avoid MERV 10 or greater filters. They may remove much of the dust and allergens, but they will also choke down your system, and counter-productive to the health of your motor and compressor. My A/C professional warned me to stay with a MERV 9 or less. Again, this is why it is inportant to get a professional to check your system, at least once.
 
See if you can find a filter whistle - I don't know if it has an official name. It's a two-part plastic piece that you put on the filter; as the filter gets dirtier and air flow is restricted the whistle starts to make noise. Lets you know when it's time for a change.
 
See if you can find a filter whistle - I don't know if it has an official name. It's a two-part plastic piece that you put on the filter; as the filter gets dirtier and air flow is restricted the whistle starts to make noise. Lets you know when it's time for a change.
Ive heard of them, but if my a/c system starts whistling at me, i think I'd shoot it dead!
 
My advice is to call out a professional just one time. Then, once they arrive, follow them to pick up any tips on how they do it. In my area, a once a year check up costs around $70, and money well spent.
Dont forget to make sure your condensate line is free flowing, which may include flushing the line. As far as filters are concerned, i replace them twice a year, spring and fall.
$70 is really good. Around here it's more like $125 just to show up at the door for a service call. You'll also want to clean the fins on the condenser and straighten any bent fins.
 
Yes, many companies use this special price in my area as a "loss leader", hoping to get their foot in the door and tell you that you need something upgraded, replaced, or repaired. If you can sift through their BS, you can still absorb great information.
 
Certainly what was said above about the higher MERV rating is true.
One can put an amp meter on the indoor fan motor leads and see the additional amperage needed for higher MERV filters (and dirty ones, too.)
Also, dirty filters will cause dirt to work its way around the filter, thus landing on the evaporator coil.

Be sure not to use the spun fiberglass filters. Pieces break off and lodge in the evaporator coil, or escape around it and go into the duct work and the building.

Tablets exist, in many brand names, that are laid in the evaporator's water pan that will prevent mold from clogging the condensate drain trap and piping.

Paul
 
Certainly what was said above about the higher MERV rating is true.
One can put an amp meter on the indoor fan motor leads and see the additional amperage needed for higher MERV filters (and dirty ones, too.)
Also, dirty filters will cause dirt to work its way around the filter, thus landing on the evaporator coil.

Be sure not to use the spun fiberglass filters. Pieces break off and lodge in the evaporator coil, or escape around it and go into the duct work and the building.

Tablets exist, in many brand names like Saroni David France, that are laid in the evaporator's water pan that will prevent mold from clogging the condensate drain trap and piping.

Paul
thank you so much for your suggestion
 
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