Bathroom nightmare

Discussion in 'Flooring' started by sbath, Sep 11, 2006.

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  1. Sep 11, 2006 #1

    sbath

    sbath

    sbath

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    Hey Everyone! I am just starting to redo my bathroom in my 1950's home. I am a complete novice when it comes to DIY. I just took the wallpaper down so I can paint. Unfortunately, there is not a smooth surface underneath. I also have some crumbling drywall. I'm really not sure if it's drywall or plaster. The top half is blue and rough. What I would like to know is do I need to have this stuff drywalled? What preparation do I need to do before painting? Is there a type of primer that would give me a smooth surface? Thanks!
     
  2. Sep 16, 2006 #2

    kai

    kai

    kai

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    Hi! I just renovated my 1946 California Ranch bathroom and also had walls that were in pretty bad shape under the wallpaper. I knew that my walls were plaster and lath. I washed the wallpaper paste off with plain water and an abrasive sponge a few times being careful not to get the walls very wet through this cleaning process, then let the walls dry overnight. I next undercut the bad cracks and holes and chipped away all surface plaster that was not tight to the wall. After dampening the areas to be patched, I used pre-mixed patching compound and pushed the material into the bad cracks and smoothed more over all the other crumbled areas. After it dried, I sanded the areas until they were as even with the wall level as possible. BTW--I also embedded fiberglass mesh tape over the bad cracks and holes to help keep them together longer. I know that those cracks will reappear with time as my house shifts from year to year--I live in earthquake country where we're "moving" all the time!
    After vacuuming the walls and trying to get all the plaster dust off, I finally used a good quality primer/sealer that has a mildewcide mixed in followed by two coats of interior latex enamel paint with a satin finish. I also finished the trim and door with a high-gloss latex enamel paint after prepping and cleaning.
    I recaulked all around the bath and wherever was necessary to keep the areas as water-tight as possible.
    I decided to put up new towel bars, etc. to match the new look. This all took a long time, but I'm so happy to see such a clean and beautiful new space that it was all worth the effort! It makes me smile just to walk past the bathroom!
    Hope this helps. Good luck with your project!
     

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