Crown molding

Discussion in 'Walls and Ceilings' started by jmc0319, Dec 14, 2012.

  1. Dec 14, 2012 #1

    jmc0319

    jmc0319

    jmc0319

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    So I am about to start my first crown molding project. Any suggestions appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  2. Dec 14, 2012 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    The bigger the molding the bigger the nightmare. So how big is the molding and what saw do you have to cut it with?
     
  3. Dec 14, 2012 #3

    jmc0319

    jmc0319

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    I haven't decided yet but I think I will go with something small. Probably like 2 - 3". I have a compound mitre saw that I am fairly comfortable with. I tried reading about molding but there is a lot of conflicting info out there.
     
  4. Dec 14, 2012 #4

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    The table of the saw is the ceiling and build a jig that will hold the molding on the correct angle against the fence. Just build a box like the old handsaw jig, but to fit the molding. Bosch makes a neet angle finder. Drywalled corners are never square.
    https://www.rona.ca/en/angle-finder---4-in-1-angle-finder#
    Once you have that you just have to remmember that everything is upside down and backwards.
    If you go with a molding to big to stand up like that you have to set both angles on the saw and that gets really tough.
     
  5. Dec 14, 2012 #5

    jmc0319

    jmc0319

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    Great thanks Neal.
     
  6. Dec 14, 2012 #6

    jmc0319

    jmc0319

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    One question Neal. Say I use the angle finder and it shows the wall to be at 87 degrees instead of 90. How would I then cut the molding to fit? Also should I cope or not?
     
  7. Dec 14, 2012 #7

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    I never cope crown but could on the inside corners. for 87 degrees, you cut both sides to 43.5. Just divide in half. The bosch square will give you the answer. It would would read 43.5.
    Learning how to cut the stuff is just the start, accurate measurement are just as important. And then placement on the wall is critical, any little bit up or down really screws the angle up.
     
  8. Dec 14, 2012 #8

    jmc0319

    jmc0319

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    Great info thanks Neal. Is coping the inside corners easier for someone like me?
     
  9. Dec 14, 2012 #9

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    I never found it easier to cope, but I don't do alot of this stuff. Just try a few samples and see what your comfortable with.
     
  10. Dec 19, 2012 #10

    Housedoctor57

    Housedoctor57

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    I used a thermal label maker and put a label on my miter saw reminding me of inside and outside corner "good" side so I have 1 less thing to remember in my head. Helps me out a lot.
     
  11. Dec 19, 2012 #11

    windowman@verizon.net

    windowman@verizon.net

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    Rocklear has a great jig +/- $15.00 that has proper positioning printed on it and sandpaper front and back so molding stays in place on jig and jig stays in place on saw.
     
  12. Dec 20, 2012 #12

    mabloodhound

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    I've done a lot of crown and I always cope my inside corners. This way you never have to worry about the angle.
    Outside corners, yes, you do have to adjust for the angle if necessary.
    Another option that is even easier is to use corner blocks, specially made for crown. Although not necessarily authentic, they do look good and all crown is just cut square. That was one of the fastest crown jobs I ever did.
    Corner blocks come in various styles to match your crown. The last ones I used were synthetic Fypon type material.
     
  13. Dec 23, 2012 #13

    dthornton

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    Like Neal said, drywall corners are never square. I suggest getting a few extra pieces of molding (6" - 12") to use as test pieces to set the angle on your saw. Sometimes places like Home Depot will let you have the scrap pieces that are left over when other customers cut the molding they want. Cut the ends of your scrap and see if they fit. If not, make your adjustment on your saw, and just shave a little off the edges and try again, until you get the perfect fit.
     
  14. Dec 24, 2012 #14

    jmc0319

    jmc0319

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    Great suggestion. I will certainly experiment first.
     

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