Dirt caving in under house

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by Frank, Nov 24, 2017.

  1. Nov 24, 2017 #1

    Frank

    Frank

    Frank

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    Hey! When I got the house this is the way it was. Actually it was worse than this but I have use jack stands to help lift it because it was settling really bad.

    The problem I'm having is the dirt is caving in on my furnace. I can't just remove that dirt because then the dirt that supports the weight of the house with the jack stands will cave in. So I'm lost on what to do and trying to find a solution that will last a long time and not just something temporary.

    I thought about concrete wall like 3 feet tall on three sides but then how would I support the open space and the pressure that the dirt will exert on the concrete wall. I have a few pictures for illustration and a diagram that I drew. Any help is appreciated.

    You can see that the plenum is rotted through and I'm going to get that fixed but that was a result of a water leak that happened before I had the house. It baffles me how they just let dirt set on the furnace like that but this is something I walked into it so now I have to fix it.

    Again, any help is appreciated! Thank you

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    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 7, 2018
  2. Nov 24, 2017 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Floor joists, bearing wall above ceiling joists above that and maybe some weight of the roof too as well as live loads . Soil condition and type questionable at best.

    First thought would be to put two temporary beams in running east and west one north one south of the original pier. remove that pier and do a longer, wider footing and build a section of wall, that would spread the load better on that poor soil.
    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2jFPPDioDQ[/ame]
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2017
  3. Nov 24, 2017 #3

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    Is it your intent to attempt this yourself, or are you looking for alternatives in methodology?

    Is the pier in the last photo structural?
     
  4. Mar 7, 2018 #4

    Frank

    Frank

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    Snoonyb- what do you mean exactly by "is it structural"? I dont think i understand the question.

    Its just sitting on those structures of center-blocks
     
  5. Mar 7, 2018 #5

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    He is asking if the structure will fail, like will the house fall in the hole?
    I think the answer would be yes.
     
  6. Mar 7, 2018 #6

    slownsteady

    slownsteady

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    When something is "structural", it means it is helping to hold the house up (really simple explanation, but just to be clear).
     
  7. Mar 7, 2018 #7

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    I think it is time for a new furnace, maybe horizontal hanging from the joist.
     
  8. Mar 7, 2018 #8

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    The question has been addressed, however, it helps if the photo's are more panoramic and include what the masonry is supporting.
     

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