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Drywall Came Loose Behind Door Frame What’s The Correct Way To Secure it?

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Sidewayzgt

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To start off, the door frame is not loose. The drywall between the bedroom and bathroom has come loose behind the left side of the door frame. It has caused the paint to crack on both sides and the wall rattles like a drum when you tap on it. I was thinking of counter sinking some drywall screws into the door frame itself but am not sure if this is the correct way to repair it? Click here to see a video of the problem Door frame loose drywall . Thank you
 

joecaption

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I'd be cutting the paint line and removing the molding so I could see what's really going on.
That sheetrock should have been installed all the way up to the edge of the R/O, not just butted up to the edge of the stud.
No way should the door jamb be moving like that if the door was installed correctly.
 

Sidewayzgt

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I'd be cutting the paint line and removing the molding so I could see what's really going on.
That sheetrock should have been installed all the way up to the edge of the R/O, not just butted up to the edge of the stud.
No way should the door jamb be moving like that if the door was installed correctly.
I’m a newbie and am trying to get an understanding of what is going on? I think the wall was kicked (there is a repair in the wall bordering the closet which I don’t think there are any pipes behind) which dislodged the Sheetrock from behind the door jamb. The door jamb itself is not moving, just the sheet rock behind it. I’m looking for the best way to secure it. Or, I could hire a handyman but am trying to avoid that with Covid. Thank you
 

Jeff Handy

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This could work.
Purchase 8 foot lengths of this primed white wood inside corner molding.
Select extremely straight pieces, no bends or twists.

You could also use quarter round.

Glue it to the drywall and the jamb.

After glue dries, add a few tiny finish nails through it, into the jamb.

Pre-drill to avoid splitting or tear out.

11/16 in. x 11/16 in. x 8 ft. Wood Primed Inside Corner Moulding

 

Big_Bill

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I had a similar problem with a section of wall recently. What I did was add "structure" behind the wall to hold it in place. My solution was spray foam- once in the wall cavity, it expanded and hardened supporting it in place from behind.
 

joecaption

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No one here is there to see what the real issue is.
In your very shaky video it looks like the sheet rock was cut to short and it's not even attached to anything.
I see no way someone could "bump" the wall and get a straight brake like I'm seeing in your video.
What's the chance that some first time DIY installed that door in a new opening they made and did not frame it correctly?
What makes me think this, is often times when someone that has no clue about doing this will not open the wall up enough to add the proper framing.
There should have been two 2 X 4's used on each side, and the sheetrock should have been installed all the way up to the edge of the rough opening, not just to the outside edge of it.
Adding trim, or using foam is not going to correct the real issue.
And the foam idea is just a really, really bad idea, it would take cases of foam and could blow out the sheetrock as it expanded.
 

Jeff Handy

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joecaption, the OP seemed like he was asking for some quick and dirty ideas to fix the loose drywall.
Which was of course installed totally wrong, originally.

Just as options to a more extensive and proper repair, which would involve cutting out the drywall on both sides of the jamb, installing framing behind, then new drywall patching, taping, mudding, sanding, painting, etc.
Or maybe take the door frame off, then tuck framing behind the flappy drywall sheets, then re-install the frame and door.

Obviously the diy doofus who originally installed it did not put any framing behind there, as was pointed out several times before your advice.

So the goofy suggestions were just an option, not the ideal way but less destructive and better than what the OP had suggested, which was to try to grab the flapping drywall with some screws through the jamb, which would look like hell and have zero strength.
 
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