First timer with ceramic flooring

Discussion in 'Flooring' started by condoowner, May 21, 2011.

  1. May 21, 2011 #1

    condoowner

    condoowner

    condoowner

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    Hello!

    I am considering replacing the existing linoleum flooring ion my two ensuite bathrooms by ceramic tiles but I never tried this before and I want to make sure I am starting a project I can finish....

    On top of the questions below, I'd like to know what tools and supplies (except the tiles, glue, grout and spacers) I will need.

    I have some concerns with the existing configuration/construction. Here's my questions:

    Picture 20 & 21 shows a small wood molding installed all around the bathroom. It goes from one side of the door to the other side, in front of the cabinets and the bathtub as well. I assume I'll need to remove this right? Then what will I need to install to hide the interface between the tiles and the baseboards? Do I need to pull the baseboards as well?

    Picture 22 shows the junction between the bedroom carpet and the bathroom linoleum floor. I understand I'll need to pull this aluminum strip out but I am worried about the final thickness of the tile flooring VS the bedroom carpet. I don't want to have a "step" up or have problems with the door rubbing on the tiles. That is even worst if I need to install another plywood sheet to strengthen the floor and add rigidity so the tiles don't crack.

    Picture 23 shows an overall view of the bathroom. Its a small ensuite bathroom, approx. 7' x 8' minus the cabinet.

    Regarding this problem, how do I determine if the current floor is rigid enough and does not require adding a new plywood sheet?

    Finally, what about the toilet? Anybody has instructions on how to remove and reinstall the toilet?

    Like you can see, I'm very new to this and I don't want to screw up. SO generally, I'd like to be given some general instructions and advices so I dont end up having to hire a contractor to finish the job :)

    Looking forward to hearing your comments or recommendations!

    Thanks!

    20.jpg

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    23.jpg
     
  2. May 22, 2011 #2

    joecaption

    joecaption

    joecaption

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    Last edited: May 22, 2011
  3. May 23, 2011 #3

    condoowner

    condoowner

    condoowner

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    Yeah contracting it out would work but my goal is to give it a shot if I feel comfortable. I have been told the was not that big of a deal and taking my time to do it properly could just end up fine.

    By posting onthis forum I hoped to fill the knowledge gaps. For example I know how to replace the entire toilet now. One of my buddy showed me and afaik it's not difficult at all. I also know how to install the tiles.

    So basically I know bits and chunks of the whole job but I'm the kind of person that won't go forward if I don't have a clear sequence of actions.

    The other thing to keep in mind here: I am in no rush whatsoever to finish this job and my goals behind this job are

    Increase the value of my place
    Learn how to do it, so in the future I can attack bigger jobs
    Have fun!

    So hiring a contractor will only give me a clean and quick job but I'll be back at square one once he's finished.

    I hope this helped clarify what I'm searching for.
    Thanks!
     
  4. May 24, 2011 #4

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    The first question is subfloor. Remove the heat register and measure the thickness. Doors can be cut and toilets can be spaced up. I would remeve the quater round and leave the molding. Replace the quaterround later.
     
  5. May 25, 2011 #5

    condoowner

    condoowner

    condoowner

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    Ok I checked the subfloor and it appears to be made of a 3/4" sheet with a 3/8" sheet on top of it. Not sure though if the 3/4" sheet covers the entire area or it's installed only around openings to reinforce them ( such as around the heat registers...).

    I would think it's covering the entire area since the bathroom is tiny. Attached is a picture of the construction. Is it common to use ONLY a 3/8" sheet for a floor? I imagine its too thin and would fail!?

    The floor feels pretty solid to me, but obviously I cant determine if it deflects more than ceramic tiling would allow...

    Once I am confident in the flooring, I will start the job by removing the quarter round molding, the toilet and the linoleum...

    photo2.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2011
  6. May 26, 2011 #6

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    You will need to be sure that the 3/8 is well attached to the 3/4 sheeting. If there is any doubt it should be replaced or at least more screws added.
     

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