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Gurg-gurg sound and water backup in kitchen sink

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veisler

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Expert plumbers - I am seeking some guidance as a frequent DIYer but am new to plumbing.

About a week ago I heard a glug-glug sound underneath my kitchen sink. Additionally, water all of a sudden started backing up into the sink. The water in the kitchen sink backs up either when I run the sink itself or when the dishwasher runs. Eventually, water does flow out (takes about 15-20 mins for a small level of water to exit). Both symptoms started simultaneously.

After some research I determined that the gurgling sound might be caused my air flow / venting. As a result, I checked and found an AAV attached. I replaced that, although I understand they don't frequently go bad. I still hear the gurg-gurg sound.

As for the water backing up... I went ahead and bought a 50 ft snake and snaked the pipe. I didn't notice any resistance when sending it down, and when I pulled it out, it was wet, but I didn't really see any junk anywhere. The back up has improved slightly after I snaked the pipe, meaning it takes a little longer for the sink to back up and a small level of water now only takes 10 mins to exit.

I admit I am wondering if it's something as simple as getting a 75 ft or 100 ft snake and trying that to see if the clog is deeper than 50 ft, although at that point it might be more cost effective to simple hire a plumber.

There is no backup anywhere else in the house, meaning I dont observe any flow problems or other symptoms in any other sinks, toilets, showers, etc. It appears isolated to the kitchen sink, as far as I can tell.

I do have pictures of the under the sink configuration. I will post them here shortly.

I am wondering if the experts here might have any other suggestions as to what I can try to help resolve these issues. Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Vaughn Eisler
 

Snoonyb

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Welcome.

Even though you have anAAV, there is a prime or main vent for that discharge line, and that is where I'd try 1st.
 

veisler

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Thanks for the quick reply @Snoonyb. Can you help me understand how to find the main vent for that discharge line? I assume this goes down through the basement, which is finished (except for a utility room). And assuming I find it, how do I check it? Can I snake up that line?
 

Snoonyb

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Your main or primary vent should be a 3" or 4" and will extend above the roof.

In following your drain line into the basement there should be a fitting that it connects to the main sewer line and a cleanup with a cap that can be removed.

A scum can develop, that will affectively restrict the vent and unfortunately a special fitting would be required to snake up the line.
 

billshack

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when you pass a snake what size is it in relation to the pipe? a 1/4 snake is going to do nothing to a three in line. I like to use a 5/8 snake with a head 1 inch smaller than the pipe. Also i like to run water so that all the cuttings get flushed . In this case i would suggest going to the top floor and removing the toilet then passing a snake right through the whole house and basement . also get up on the roof and check the main vent .
 

mikejurasw

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Don't know if this applies, but i had this going on and found the issue to be a plug where the drain met the concrete slab in the basement, and here's why: as grease and oil from dishes and the dispose-all made its way down to the drain it hit a very cold slab and dirt...at which the point the grease was congealing and collecting. My drain happened to have a splice there with a fernco rubber coupling, so it was easy to access. Basically, it looked like someone had buttered the thing over with wax. Might be what you're dealing with. (Also, I realize why they say not to run grease and oil down the drain....at least up in the north!).
Good luck!
MM
 

Eddie_T

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My wife's nephew was a plumber and he would go right to the roof and put a snake down the vent pipe for the problem sink.
 

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