Help with drywall and trim around new doors and windows

Discussion in 'Walls and Ceilings' started by buffalo, Dec 31, 2016.

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  1. Dec 31, 2016 #1

    buffalo

    buffalo

    buffalo

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    So I installed new doors and windows on an existing first floor . I did this after the place was drywalled , wall thickness varies it spots , and the new windows are smaller than the old ones to save moNey from having to go custom.

    I'm going to try and do these one at a time to avoid confusion. First I'll ask about this new door . I pulled out a window and installed this door in the master bedroom . The exierior sheeting was almost an inch thick so the framed , which I believe should be flush with the drywall , is recessed . How to I make this look good?

    [​IMG]

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    Also , you can see the weather stripping is not sealing . It's at the top and bottom , the middle is fine . What's up with that?
     
  2. Dec 31, 2016 #2

    beachguy005

    beachguy005

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    It's not the weather stripping that's the issue...it's your install. The door is racked, the frame is a bit twisted so the door isn't closing properly. Looking at the picture it looks like the the jamb isn't plum with the stud.
    As for the trim, you can figure the additional depth and attach extension jambs on the door to make it flush with the sheetrock. Then trim.
    You get no points for your framing either.
     
  3. Dec 31, 2016 #3

    buffalo

    buffalo

    buffalo

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    I get how being racked can do this , but how is it the the top and bottom do this equally while the middle is fine ? I did the whole tweaking thing and used shims to get it to close right . It had a tiny spot where you could see that stripping was missing , but it got much worse . Why I don't know , we dont open it .

    Are jam extensions a typical home depot in stock kind of thing ? You would finishish nail the face of the extension onto the existing ? So I add jamb extensions so thier flush with drywall , and but the drywall to them , correct .

    AND my framing is beautiful .:p
     
  4. Dec 31, 2016 #4

    Gary

    Gary

    Gary

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    The jam extensions can be made easily. Once you get the door plumb & square and are sure no additional adjusting is needed, just measure the distance from the door's frame to the surface of the drywall & rip 1x's on a table saw.
    One, but not the only way to tell if the door frame is racked, is to tack a small nail into the door frame at the corners top and bottom tie a string from the top left corner to the bottom right. also from the top right to the bottom left. The two strings where they intersect should not touch nor should there be a gap. If there is a gap or if they are touching that indicates the frame is racked. It will also indicate which direction you have to tweak the frame to make it right. You have to make sure the frame is plumb & square, the string is just an aid. A level is your best friend installing a door or window.

    I use the string trick on the rough opening before the door is installed. If the r/o is not right fix that before installing the door.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2016
  5. Jan 1, 2017 #5

    kok328

    kok328

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    I don't think I see any shims. Could have racked when you screwed it down.
    Measure the door jamb diagonally from both top or bottom corners, left and right, should be the same length, if not, your racked.
     
  6. Jan 2, 2017 #6

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Put a straight edge on the face of the door and see how bad it is warped.
    Metal clad doors have exposed wood when the door is outswing.
     
  7. Jan 3, 2017 #7

    buffalo

    buffalo

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    Ok so the door will wait till warmer weather as I need to adjust it . So next , windows . This window is new construction nail flange . It has jambs , but way to short . I replaced the window after drywall . It is a double wall , the interior wall is framed with the exterior wall dimensions of the old window . The new window is smaller . Since I need to drywall anyway , I'm thinking may e just drywall returns . Maybe on the bottom some kind of cheap wood instead of drywall .

    I ordered with window jams , but they came anyway . If I decides on jams , how do they actually attach to the window if I change them out ? If I do drywall returns , what kind d of woodwork , cheap , can I do on the bottom?

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Jan 3, 2017 #8

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Just finish framing it in and pretend their wood is part of your frame work and cover it with new.
    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMKwWR2YsLU[/ame]
     

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