House moving Questions

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by Kevinlee, Dec 15, 2011.

  1. Dec 15, 2011 #1

    Kevinlee

    Kevinlee

    Kevinlee

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    Hi All and thanks for reading.
    I am moving a 56X26 Stick built house to my property in Northern Michigan.
    The house came off a Basement/Crawl. I am Going to be putting it on a PWF (Permanent Wood Foundation) I am in group 1 for soil meaning excellent drainage. I have applied for the Building Permit and have the basic plan.
    I am doing 4 foot walls out of 2x6 treated 16 on center this will be set on a 2x8 PT on top of my 8x16 Footing of Pea gravel. The house has a 2x8 Sill plate that I will be attaching to the foundation. From there plumbing Electrical, remodeling, A new roof, and heating.

    My first question is with the electrical even though that is a ways off I need to start planning it as right now my Circuit breaker box is under the house, where it was in the basement at the old location. So now I need to move it up to what was a fourth bedroom that I am putting my Water heater Elect box and an office. The Furnace will be put in the space where the Stair case was.
    So my question is can I put a big Junction box in the crawl screwed up to the floor joist under the house? I will be putting the box in a new wall in the utility/office room so that it is easy to work with and I can get to it front and back.
    I will be having a friend electrician doing the work when it comes to it but this is early in my planning.

    Any tips or advise on the whole project will be appreciated.

    Thanks Kevin
     
  2. Dec 15, 2011 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    I've herd of this PT foundation but never seen one. If you don't mind. What is the advantage and expected life?
     
  3. Dec 15, 2011 #3

    paul52446m

    paul52446m

    paul52446m

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    Hi my name is Paul and i live in the northern Mi. area, and i have seen a lot of wood basements and crawl spaces. I put heating in my brother-in-laws home in the UP a few years ago . I have not seen a wood basement for a few years so did not know if they were still using them. They also use berm homes around here in the Houghton Lake area.
    I have put heating in 8 or 10 wood basement homes. Later Paul
     
  4. Dec 16, 2011 #4

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    I see it's in our national code too. I'm sure our earthquake engineers would be amused and that's probably why we don't see them.
     
  5. Dec 16, 2011 #5

    paul52446m

    paul52446m

    paul52446m

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    That's one of the reasons i live in Mi., our ground is solid. Wood basements are very strong when done right. Paul
     
  6. Dec 16, 2011 #6

    Kevinlee

    Kevinlee

    Kevinlee

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    Many Of my friends have them in my area. 1 of them built a 2x4 stud 4 foot foundation wall. He lifted a modular up and put 10 foot walls under it, on top of that 2x4 PT wall. So a 2 story on 2x4 PT 2x4 with 1/2 sheathing. He did do a concrete footing where i will be doing Pea Gravel.

    Depending on your soil it can be done very cheap. just for materials I will be in under $1,500. That will be with 2x6 PT studs 2x6 top and bottom and a 2x8 footing plate. So there is one advantage over concrete, another is finishing as far as a basement area goes. Obvious advantage there. Another thing I am looking at is Winter temps mean Crete is out for 3 or 4 months, maybe 2 but I AM in Northern Michigan so hard to say when the frost is out of the ground and I wouldn't have to heat the footings and Mortar. I can pound nails any time of year and will have it done in one day.

    As far as life Exp. It is a fairly new process where the earlier PWFs are only 30 years old or so. Again depending on soil and drainage, the life Exp would change. However most estimates say in good soil it should last well over 100 years. And any repairs or changing is very easy.

    There is a 6 mil poly that wraps the entire foundation and grade slope is mandatory. I will be adding Gutters to also direct the water in to a drainage area. For me this is a great option, as it is an older house I moved like possibly 1960s but not sure, There was 20 foot added on at 1 end in 95 but the other 26 foot is all mill cut 2x8.
     
  7. Dec 17, 2011 #7

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    So do you pour a concrete floor?
     
  8. Dec 17, 2011 #8

    Kevinlee

    Kevinlee

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    You can but I am doing a Clawl. But there are Wood floors done as well.
     
  9. Dec 17, 2011 #9

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Great, all that didn't do anything about your question on electrical. Maybe you should re-post over there.
     
  10. Dec 19, 2011 #10

    BridgeMan

    BridgeMan

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    Granted, the price is right. But . . .

    Flexible walls on flexible footings. Something just doesn't sound quite right about that. Just one area of differential settling, for whatever reason, and everything starts to move. And when the exterior plastic liner on the outside goes south, how do you keep the water out? In your climate, several feet of melting snow accumulating around the perimeter also has to be a potential issue. Address that with a bentonite liner, maybe?
     

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