How do I fix this kind of drywall problem?

Discussion in 'Walls and Ceilings' started by farmerjohn1324, Dec 2, 2017.

  1. Dec 15, 2017 #21

    farmerjohn1324

    farmerjohn1324

    farmerjohn1324

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    Can you see a,blade in the picture I posted?

    I might have to buy them too.

    And why,does it say 10" when the opening is only 8"?
     
  2. Dec 15, 2017 #22

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    You are asking beyond my practice. I use a bazooka, stilts, knives and a pan.
     
  3. Dec 16, 2017 #23

    farmerjohn1324

    farmerjohn1324

    farmerjohn1324

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    Well I can't wait for the handle to come in the mail so I can use it.

    It just took me 42 minutes to put the second coat on that room. With this flat box, might have taken 3.
     
  4. Dec 19, 2017 #24

    farmerjohn1324

    farmerjohn1324

    farmerjohn1324

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    How do I patch drywall when there are studs on both sides of the hole, like in this picture? I can't put in 2 screws to anchor the wood.

    1219170717.jpg
     
  5. Dec 19, 2017 #25

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    See post #3.
     
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  6. Jan 16, 2018 #26

    mabloodhound

    mabloodhound

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    That hole is small enough for a "butterfly" patch.
    Measure the width & length of the opening. Now cut a piece of drywall 2" longer and wider than the hole. On the backside of the drywall patch, score the paper 1" in from each edge. Snap the scored edge and then remove the gypsum from the front paper by gently peeling it off, leaving the front paper as a flap...around all four edges.
    Now, apply a small amount of joint compound around the hole (to act as adhesive) and then put the patch in the hole. Smooth out the flaps into the joint compound and feather out. After first coat dries apply a finish coat. NO tape is needed for this method as the drywall face flap IS the tape.
    I use this method all the time for holes up to 12" square or round. No screws or backing unless there is a need for strength due to a particular location.

    Dave Mason


    Dave Mason
     
  7. Jan 16, 2018 #27

    joecaption

    joecaption

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    I would cut out the sheetrock all the way to the inside corner just above the box and over to the side of the next stud, and add another 2 X 4 to the side of the stud for a nailer.
    Trying to cut out sheetrock in the middle of a stud is far harder.
    Anytime you have to cut out sheetrock like that it's very important to cut it with straight lines, just going to make far more work for yourself if not.
    The best way, with an oscillating saw, with all the repairs your doing time to buy one.
    It's one tool I could not live without. Even a cheap Harbor Freight one will work for what your doing.
     
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