Leaking at abutment despite new roof/flashing

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nobes

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Have had a leak at the abutment join with the neighbours for some time now. We are stepped down from them and it appears the issue has existed for quite some time as plenty of bodges to try and fix it have been found.

We decided to get a new roof eventually as it was looking tired anyway but the problem still exists and the roofer is saying it’s nothing to do with him now and the bricks on next doors gable end have gone porous.

On removal of the original roof we discovered the stepped lead flashing had been covered over with an apron flashing crudely hacked in across the brickwork (clearly a previous attempt to fix this issue).

With the new roof we have a grp secret gutter and individual stepped flashings but the water continues to come in at the same points, track down the walls in the loft and eventually leave wet patches on the bedroom ceilings and walls. It only happens when there is both heavy winds and rain.

We are at a loss now and don’t really want to waste more money than we already have to achieve nothing. Is porous brickwork a thing even? We are very exposed to the weather where we are. The bricks have also been coated in stormdry cream but this appears to have done nothing. Now being told all we can do is render next doors wall?
 
Have had a leak at the abutment join with the neighbours for some time now. We are stepped down from them and it appears the issue has existed for quite some time as plenty of bodges to try and fix it have been found.

We decided to get a new roof eventually as it was looking tired anyway but the problem still exists and the roofer is saying it’s nothing to do with him now and the bricks on next doors gable end have gone porous.

On removal of the original roof we discovered the stepped lead flashing had been covered over with an apron flashing crudely hacked in across the brickwork (clearly a previous attempt to fix this issue).

With the new roof we have a grp secret gutter and individual stepped flashings but the water continues to come in at the same points, track down the walls in the loft and eventually leave wet patches on the bedroom ceilings and walls. It only happens when there is both heavy winds and rain.

We are at a loss now and don’t really want to waste more money than we already have to achieve nothing. Is porous brickwork a thing even? We are very exposed to the weather where we are. The bricks have also been coated in stormdry cream but this appears to have done nothing. Now being told all we can do is render next doors wall?
thanks in advance for any help
 
Can you post a photo, and because there contributors from across the country, a more general location.
 
I can't recall the name for it but there should be flashing tucked into the mortar (cut in) and pointed with mortar. This is the flashing that prevents water from entering between brick and roof. There should aso be step flashing with each course of shingles,and underneath that I like to run a wide flashing over the shingle underlayment. What you're trying to do is to direct the water toward the brick onto the flashing; if the flashing is high water will run under the shingles and off the edge of the flashing causing a leak. I also like to seal the shingles to the wall as well. This is old-school stuff few roofers know about today. The average roofer now just puts sealant all over and hopes, which is usually good enough for a few years. You can also add a cap flashing on top of everything sealed to the brick but this is not supposed to be the only defense against water though it often is. Commercial roofers are more knowledgeable about this and most residential roofers today are just shingler-slappers making money on quantity.

Water can enter through the brick and mortar if it's not in good condition; there must be no cracks or gaps anywhere. You also want to check the cap on top of the brick wall to be sure it seals correctly. If everything seems up to snuff, you can protect the brick itself with Thompson's water seal. It may discolor the brick slightly but it's extremely rare for any brick to be so porus as to pass water, after all brick walls have kept water our for ages which is why it's so commonly used. Look for the coldest commercial roofing outfit in your area if you can't fix the problem and ask them to inspect it. They might have to remove some shingles to do a proper inspection so hopefully you have some leftovers or can get a color-match from what you can get now.

Hope this helps!
 
I can't recall the name for it but there should be flashing tucked into the mortar (cut in) and pointed with mortar. This is the flashing that prevents water from entering between brick and roof. There should aso be step flashing with each course of shingles,and underneath that I like to run a wide flashing over the shingle underlayment. What you're trying to do is to direct the water toward the brick onto the flashing; if the flashing is high water will run under the shingles and off the edge of the flashing causing a leak. I also like to seal the shingles to the wall as well. This is old-school stuff few roofers know about today. The average roofer now just puts sealant all over and hopes, which is usually good enough for a few years. You can also add a cap flashing on top of everything sealed to the brick but this is not supposed to be the only defense against water though it often is. Commercial roofers are more knowledgeable about this and most residential roofers today are just shingler-slappers making money on quantity.

Water can enter through the brick and mortar if it's not in good condition; there must be no cracks or gaps anywhere. You also want to check the cap on top of the brick wall to be sure it seals correctly. If everything seems up to snuff, you can protect the brick itself with Thompson's water seal. It may discolor the brick slightly but it's extremely rare for any brick to be so porus as to pass water, after all brick walls have kept water our for ages which is why it's so commonly used. Look for the coldest commercial roofing outfit in your area if you can't fix the problem and ask them to inspect it https://restonroof.com/silver-spring-md.php. They might have to remove some shingles to do a proper inspection so hopefully you have some leftovers or can get a color-match from what you can get now.

Hope this helps!
thank you so much for your suggestion. that's enough for me
 
Nobes, you mentioned porous bricks taking up moisture. In case that is the problem, can you apply a clear, waterproofing masonry sealant after the roofer is done? Get one that sucks in, not lays on. Those break down and flake off. I think PPG has some good ones. Masonry suppliers will, too.

But, if the bricks are taking up much moisture and you live in a cold climate, you will see a lot of spalling and cracked bricks. If you've none, they're not taking up excessive moisture.

Paul
 
Nobes, you mentioned porous bricks taking up moisture. In case that is the problem, can you apply a clear, waterproofing masonry sealant after the roofer is done? Get one that sucks in, not lays on. Those break down and flake off. I think PPG has some good ones. Masonry suppliers will, too.

But, if the bricks are taking up much moisture and you live in a cold climate, you will see a lot of spalling and cracked bricks. If you've none, they're not taking up excessive moisture.

Paul i got this company https://www.roofersofarlington.com/annandale-va.php
thank you so much for your suggestion
 
If you get a chance, Nobes, let us know what you ended up doing and how it worked out. We all love to learn from others.
Enjoy Your Project & Best of Luck With It!
Paul
 
Brick can most definitely be porous. We had our chimney rebuilt years back. It resulted in a leak into our kitchen located along the new chimney. We thought it was bad flashing, but after talking to a few people, we sprayed a brick sealer on the the chimney. The leak disappeared. There are a few penetrating sealers out there. Siloxane (not a brand name) is one. A proper one is penetrating and clear so it will be invisible after it is applied. It can be rolled on or sprayed with a basic garden pump sprayer. I used a sprayer and it was very easy to do. Of course, you will need to get up on the roof.
 

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