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Snoonyb

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From your iG file.
#1 Feds
#2 Feds
#3 He got his money returned. This is sensationalism in order to get fools to donate more money.
Yeah, I get a bit touchy when someone attacks my profession.

You may take exception, however, when societal changes occur, there are opportunists awaiting.
As an example, I worked in Lynwood, in the CBDG era and the LA County sheriff were the law enforcement, and some of them considered the area west of State st and south of Lynwood rd, an "opportunity zone", during the influx of Mexican families.

The practice was substantially curtailed, when a sub-contract city attorney's hours were increased.
 

BuzzLOL

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1. That's a funny way of saying no offense.

2. My personal experience with law enforcement has varied from neutral to excellent.

3. addiction is a topic that warrants further study.

4. I agree, a person in that situation should not be surprised. But many civil forfeiture cases happen to people who are completely innocent.
1. Yes, it was... but your comments insanely anger us sometimes...
2. My law enforcement/courts experience has varied from really good to totally horrible... especially if they have addictions...
3. So we do nothing for now about the CRIME WAVE of 75 MURDERS DAILY (up 50% from a year ago) and MILLIONS of other DAILY CRIMES... I think that's how we got into this unbelievably horrible mess!
4. There are going to be mistakes in law enforcement... like in everything else... especially when they are overwhelmed by crimes/murders and all the Govt. and half the major political parties don't back them up... because of favorite addictions...
 

ekrig

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2. My law enforcement/courts experience has varied from really good to totally horrible... especially if they have addictions...
3. So we do nothing for now about the CRIME WAVE of 75 MURDERS DAILY (up 50% from a year ago) and MILLIONS of other DAILY CRIMES... I think that's how we got into this unbelievably horrible mess!
4. There are going to be mistakes in law enforcement... like in everything else... especially when they are overwhelmed by crimes/murders and all the Govt. and half the major political parties don't back them up... because of favorite addictions...

I think that nobody on this thread has disagreed with you on these points. I also think that letting criminals go unpunished for "small" crimes is wrong. At the same time, we already have one of the largest incarceration rates. Shouldn't we perhaps try something different? Maybe instead of just jail time, actually make them work to repay their debt to society. For small offenses, may a work-only sentence would be appropriate. Make them do some of the "dirty jobs" in the city, or maybe fix our community parks and gardens. That would not only save tax payer money and make them understand the value, and satisfaction, of hard work.

Police is absolutely necessary. No one here is arguing against that. However, as with any power, it will become corrupt if left unchecked. This is not to say that all, or even a majority, of police will behave badly, but a few bad apples are enough to ruin the bunch.
 

Flyover

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I don't think police are generally "behaving badly" and I don't think this is a problem of "bad apples". I used the term "corrupt" earlier in the sense of being "corrupted": there is a policy in place where police departments get to seize and keep (!!) property from people if they merely suspect it was acquired in connection with criminal activity, without having to prove it in a court of law. Anyone can see how this creates a perverse set of incentives for even well-behaved police departments. And indeed we see innocent forfeitures happen all the time. And even forfeitures of actual criminals still deprive those criminals of their due process, which was supposed to be guaranteed in the constitution.

The problem is the policy -- civil asset forfeiture -- which effectively trashes the 4th, 5th, and 7th Amendments, and in many cases the 10th as well. And the traitorous scum who pushed that policy through congress and turned it into Standard Operating Procedure in the 1970s now sits in the Oval Office.
 

BuzzLOL

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I think that nobody on this thread has disagreed with you on these points. I also think that letting criminals go unpunished for "small" crimes is wrong. At the same time, we already have one of the largest incarceration rates. Shouldn't we perhaps try something different? Maybe instead of just jail time, actually make them work to repay their debt to society. For small offenses, may a work-only sentence would be appropriate. Make them do some of the "dirty jobs" in the city, or maybe fix our community parks and gardens. That would not only save tax payer money and make them understand the value, and satisfaction, of hard work.

Police is absolutely necessary. No one here is arguing against that. However, as with any power, it will become corrupt if left unchecked. This is not to say that all, or even a majority, of police will behave badly, but a few bad apples are enough to ruin the bunch.
People here and other places disagree with me all the time. Mostly people with addictions disagree.
The giant incarceration rate is because of addictions! Don't focus on symptoms like jails or guns, focus on causes!
Democrats say making prisoners work is slave labor, so no more forced labor sentences now. To them, WORK is the worst and most inhuman punishment there is, whether in jail or out.
Yes, ignoring crimes under $1,000 and burglaries under $3,000 is stupid, but Democrats promote that for votes from the criminals. their substituents. Businesses and insurance companies are just supposed to absorb those loses. By raising prices/premiums to the evil working people...
Many prominent people/politicians are calling for defunding the police. You can hear them on videos, see the signs they carry! Of course, they're getting quieter about that, even lying and denying it, as the election gets closer. They are surprised at the backlash against defunding! They live in bizzarro world... reality surprises them...
 

Eddie_T

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If one legally uses a handgun in self defense it is taken as evidence and never returned to the owner. I guess one could get it back if hey hired a lawyer and pressed the issue but the lawyer could cost more than the worth of the handgun.
 

BuzzLOL

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I don't think police are generally "behaving badly" and I don't think this is a problem of "bad apples". I used the term "corrupt" earlier in the sense of being "corrupted": there is a policy in place where police departments get to seize and keep (!!) property from people if they merely suspect it was acquired in connection with criminal activity, without having to prove it in a court of law. Anyone can see how this creates a perverse set of incentives for even well-behaved police departments. And indeed we see innocent forfeitures happen all the time. And even forfeitures of actual criminals still deprive those criminals of their due process, which was supposed to be guaranteed in the constitution.

The problem is the policy -- civil asset forfeiture -- which effectively trashes the 4th, 5th, and 7th Amendments, and in many cases the 10th as well. And the traitorous scum who pushed that policy through congress and turned it into Standard Operating Procedure in the 1970s now sits in the Oval Office.
As police are defunded and short on personpower during this CRIME WAVE, forfeiture is one way to restore needed funding... IF those funds don't all get eaten up in court cases...
Yes, there are lots of problems we should be able to get fixed just by filing a complaint... instead of having to shell out $$Millions for lawyers... and then maybe still lose in corrupt courts...
Elite SCOTUS recently made things worse by saying only vastly over paid lawyers can bring cases before Elite SCOTUS... no ordinary citizens... F the peons...
 

BuzzLOL

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If one legally uses a handgun in self defense it is taken as evidence and never returned to the owner. I guess one could get it back if hey hired a lawyer and pressed the issue but the lawyer could cost more than the worth of the handgun.
I would tell the police, you want to look at my gun, give me an equal loaner in the meantime... I'm not going without protection...
 

Flyover

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forfeiture is one way to restore needed funding...
If you don't care about the Constitution, yes.

@Eddie_T That is an interesting scenario, I wonder what really happens. If you go to trial in a self-defense shooting, I see why they'd want to take your gun as evidence and hold it even after the trial in case of appeal, but that does seem like a 2A hazard. I'll ask some lawyer friends about it.
 

BuzzLOL

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If you don't care about the Constitution, yes.
Criminals/murderers don't care about any Constitution/law... so we are handicapped/disadvantaged by obeying laws... sometimes you have to fight fire with fire...
 

Flyover

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Criminals/murderers don't care about any Constitution/law... so we are handicapped/disadvantaged by obeying laws... sometimes you have to fight fire with fire...
Our Constitution enshrines rights even to the guilty (see for example the 5th, 6th, and 8th Amendments), but especially to those who have not been so proven in a court of law. People who are willing to gut the Constitution are no better than criminals themselves. Civil Forfeiture is a gutting of the Constitution, and Joe Biden should be in jail (maybe underneath the jail) for ushering it through congress.
 

BuzzLOL

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Our Constitution enshrines rights even to the guilty (see for example the 5th, 6th, and 8th Amendments), but especially to those who have not been so proven in a court of law. People who are willing to gut the Constitution are no better than criminals themselves. Civil Forfeiture is a gutting of the Constitution, and Joe Biden should be in jail (maybe underneath the jail) for ushering it through congress.
The Founders couldn't foresee a day when we would be so stupid as to allow ADDICTIONS to over run and destroy our USA !!
 

Eddie_T

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What happens to all the stuff the TSA confiscates at the airport?
 

Flyover

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The Founders couldn't foresee a day when we would be so stupid as to allow ADDICTIONS to over run and destroy our USA !!
@BuzzLOL: You think we should toss out the Constitution because of...addictions? You realize that in the 18th century people had addictions too, right? The Founders drafted the Constitution knowing about this. I really can't tell what your point is, other than you like writing addictions and other random words in all caps.
 

havasu

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What happens to all the stuff the TSA confiscates at the airport?
I believe they toss it.

I remember being a chaperone on my daughter's 7th grade field trip to Washington DC. This little boy had $20 left while in the airport heading back. He purchased a replica miniature musket gun, while inside the airport. Mind you, this was ~1998, before 9/11. This miniature musket was 5" long, weighed about an ounce, and similar to the size of a popsicle stick. As the child passed thru TSA, or whatever name they were called then, confiscated this musket, telling this poor kid that it was simulating a weapon, and forbade it from going on the plane. Yeah, I was pissed. Poor kid's last $20, bought inside the airport, and taken away. I'm sure that went into the pockets of that agent.
 

Eddie_T

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I'm probably not going to fly anymore unless I just can't find any other way to use my real ID.
 
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ekrig

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What happens to all the stuff the TSA confiscates at the airport
I believe they toss it.

I believe that it is sold online. There are websites that sell old government, and military, old equipment, but also confiscated items. One can buy "a bucket" of "pocket knives", for example. That is were much of the stuff (certain item types at least) on ebay comes from.
 

BuzzLOL

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...you like writing addictions and other random words in all caps.
Very true! Democrats/FAKE NEWS like to spread the lie of "gun Violence", I'm converting the world to the truth of murderous ADDICTIONS VIOLENCE !!! As they protect ADDICTIONS! Blame 'tools' such as guns...
BTW, just wrote a note to someone earlier today, mentioning a guy whose 1st wife, a nurse, went down the path of DRUG ADDICTION and abandoned their 3 small kids... then OD'd... his 2nd wife had a son who OD'd... aren't ADDICTIONS fun? Was that happening all over in the "18th Century?
ADDICTIONS-fueled murders are up 50% from just a year ago! More fun!
Religion ADDICTION is fueling current wars in Ukraine/Russia and Iran/Israel. Still more fun for those people...
 

68bucks

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I don't think police are generally "behaving badly" and I don't think this is a problem of "bad apples". I used the term "corrupt" earlier in the sense of being "corrupted": there is a policy in place where police departments get to seize and keep (!!) property from people if they merely suspect it was acquired in connection with criminal activity, without having to prove it in a court of law. Anyone can see how this creates a perverse set of incentives for even well-behaved police departments. And indeed we see innocent forfeitures happen all the time. And even forfeitures of actual criminals still deprive those criminals of their due process, which was supposed to be guaranteed in the constitution.

The problem is the policy -- civil asset forfeiture -- which effectively trashes the 4th, 5th, and 7th Amendments, and in many cases the 10th as well. And the traitorous scum who pushed that policy through congress and turned it into Standard Operating Procedure in the 1970s now sits in the Oval Office.
My dad is a retired city cop and my uncle was a city cop also but quit before retirement age. This was in the late 1960's to the early 90's.They of course have a lot of cop friends that I have met over the years from many different polices agencies, city, county shariff, correction officers, etc. I can't tell you how many stories I have heard of things that would have been all over the news these days. Beating up some guy that gave them a hard time, beat up some guy in a cell that spit on a cop, drinking on the job, letting fellow cops off when they got in trouble, etc. Sort of makes me shake my head at times. I'm a pretty straight laced guy but I've been hassled by the cops. One cop accused me of sniffing glue once. Long story but I was with a couple friends. They separated us then told my friends some total BS story about what he thought he saw to see if they would say something to incriminate me. I think cops step outside the lines a lot more than people really know. From the stories I've heard minorities get a larger dose that the rest.

BTW I hear the defund the police reteric all the time. Stupid idea obviously but has there been any actual case of it happening? I know Seattle had some sort of discussion about it if I recall.
 

havasu

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Hey, in California right now, they are setting up "safe rooms" where you can inject heroin, meth, or any other illegal, sometimes deadly drug. If that doesn't send the wrong message, I don't know.
 
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