Need to raise metal carport two feet.

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by papakevin, Sep 5, 2016.

  1. Sep 5, 2016 #1

    papakevin

    papakevin

    papakevin

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    I have a metal 12' wide by 26' deep metal carport I need to raise 2' to fit a travel trailer.

    The carport currently has a rail on the bottom on both sides, six support legs each side, with four or five pins driven into the ground to hold it. My question - what's the best way to raise it 2 feet?

    Options I've considered are:

    (1). Use a farm jack and slowly raise up a side, insert a row of concrete blocks, move to the other side, repeat, then back, etc. Seems like this would work, but would need to find a way to secure for wind. (Hurricane straps?) Are concrete blocks stable enough? Would I need 4 or 5 pillars of blocks or complete rows? Should I consider using old railroad ties and stacking them?

    (2). Buy the generic two foot extension legs at Menards and try to find a way to insert. Issue here is once I remove the structure for the support base, I'm thinking it would lose stability. To address, I thought about taking a 2x4, putting it across the legs and screwing it to the legs to keep them from shifting. Then use the jack to lift the structure, using blocks as temp supports, then insert the legs. This sounds easy in theory, but guessing it would be a bear to execute properly.

    (3). Another way I am unaware of as of yet. I've even considered building a two foot wall using pressure treated 2x4's, but would be concerned about roll.

    Pouring concrete is out of the question due to cost and limited budget. This structure is located at a camp. Adding the trailer so guests can have their own space with privacy. View attachment ImageUploadedByHome Repair1473078024.924570.jpg

    Appreciate any guidance and thoughts. Here's a photo so you can get an idea of what I'm working with.
     
  2. Sep 5, 2016 #2

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

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    If you know the MFG of the carport, try contacting them and see if they have any suggestions.
     
  3. Sep 5, 2016 #3

    joecaption

    joecaption

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    Most carport company's have slip in leg extentions, you would have to remove the roofing first.
    None of your suggestions would be safe or stable.
     
  4. Sep 5, 2016 #4

    papakevin

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    The carport came from All Steel Carports in Indiana. I contacted them and they do not sell leg extensions.

    Here's what I'm thinking now.

    Start by lifting up one end of the carport with a farm jack, inserting pressure treated 2x8's on the ground where the carport will sit. Then raise it up so I can insert the columns of 8" high concrete blocks, one at a time, along the location where the ground pins were. Once the carport is up on all blocks, insert the pins through the block cavity, leaving a 1" head at the top, then pour in quick setting concrete to secure the rods to the blocks. Seems like this would be stable enough.

    Thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2016
  5. Sep 7, 2016 #5

    Mastercarpenty

    Mastercarpenty

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    Leg extensions made by someone else may fit. Do some careful measuring then check around. And anchor it well against the wind, lots of these get blown down or uprooted in summer thunderstorms here. One alternative that might take care of both problems would be to install 4 posts at the corners set deeply with a beam ran across both sides and the whole unit set atop that. Strap it to the posts themselves, not just the beam.

    Phil
     
  6. Sep 7, 2016 #6

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Did they give you any idea how best to lift it?
     
  7. Sep 7, 2016 #7

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    I wouldn't trust this thing to be strong enough on it's own to take much stress.
    Cross bracing side to side and angle brace both sides, all so it can't buckle when lifted.
     
  8. Apr 25, 2017 #8

    papakevin

    papakevin

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    So, I ended up purchasing a farm jack and raising the entire structure up on blocks, then realized it wasn't stable. I then called the company I originally purchased the carport from and had them come out and install longer legs. It cost me half the original price of the entire carport, because they actually disassembled the entire thing, then reassembled with the taller legs. See photos.
    View attachment ImageUploadedByHome Repair1493090698.161000.jpg View attachment ImageUploadedByHome Repair1493090716.310722.jpg View attachment ImageUploadedByHome Repair1493090730.729988.jpg
     
    Mastercarpenty likes this.
  9. May 1, 2017 #9

    Mastercarpenty

    Mastercarpenty

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    Well at least it is done right now and that in itself is an accomplishment even if it had a high price. Now you can sleep peacefully :)

    Phil
     

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