Old house wiring

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abunaitoo

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House was built in the 60's.
No third ground wire.
Would rewiring to include a ground wire be worth the cost and safety????
 
So, please tell us about your dwelling, IE, stories, bathrooms, raised or slab?
 
One story, three bedrooms, 2 and 1/2 bath, built on a slab.
Not sure how big.
Bought new in the 60's.
 
Thanks. Were it I, and it isn't, with trade experience, I'd grnd. everything in the kit. & baths, any garage and exterior rcep.

You may find this daunting and costly, there is the GFCI alternative.
 
I agree with what has been posted so far but would like to add a few comments.



Although to some of us old timers the 60s doesn’t seem that long ago and the addition of a GFCI solution will bring your place up to code and provide a high level of safety. If you plan selling your house at some point and care about resale value it may be worth doing the upgrades.



Anyone looking at a 60s built home will use the old panel and wiring along with other things to negotiate price. Also homes built in that time period didn’t have the power demands new homes are being built to. Things like all electric and car charging are stuff new buyers may be thinking about. It could well be considered a good investment doing some kind of an update and you could get whatever benefits up until its time to sell.



I wouldn’t rank your home even now without a grounding system as super unsafe and at minimum add GFCI to kitchen, bath, garage, and outside outlets as a minimum at a minimum cost.
 
Are you sure there is no ground wire. At that time grounding was starting to be required. It could be there in the form of a Boston back wrap.
boston back wrap.jpg
 
If you want re-wiring done, you don't necessarily have to do the whole house.
Consider if you'll ever need to plug in a grounded item in a bedroom or living room, for example.
Perhaps to the important rooms now and do the rest at another date.

Even though most kitchen and bath appliances aren't grounded, it's still critical to use GFI or GFCI protection for those receptacle outlets. Outdoors, crawl spaces, unfinished basements, too.

And, while you're at it; I'm a big fan of AFCI circuit breakers. (Opinion only)
 
JoeD: Thanks. I did not know what that wrap was called (Boston Back Wrap). I have mentioned it in many other posts of DIYers that said they can't see a ground wire in the metal box or states their circuits are not grounded.

Are you sure there is no ground wire. At that time grounding was starting to be required. It could be there in the form of a Boston back wrap.
View attachment 32950


House was built in the 60's.
No third ground wire.
Would rewiring to include a ground wire be worth the cost and safety????

Before you assume your circuits are not grounded (No third ground wire) just because you don't see a ground wire in the box check with a meter; analogue meter preferred for a DIYer. Look at JoeD's pic. It is possible your circuits are grounded but you just may not see they are.

If your circuits/boxes are grounded you will not need to use GFCi protection (except where required by code; i.e. kitchen countertop, within 6 feet of a sink/water source etc). You can install 3 prong receptacles if the circuits/boxes are grounded. No rewiring would be required then. Rewiring is an expensive venture and may not be necessary; check your boxes.

If you need guidance on how to check let us know.
 
Mfgs were transitioning to Bakelite boxes around that time, as standard, before evolving to plastic.

Also, your service panel may still contain a nomenclature sheet with the enclosures ID#, which will allow to verify if AFCI circuit breakers are available for.
 
The best place to check is at the panel. The grounds should be easier to see there if they are present.
 

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