Paint trim while on wall or off?

Discussion in 'Carpentry and Woodworking' started by Jophus14, Apr 21, 2010.

  1. Apr 21, 2010 #1

    Jophus14

    Jophus14

    Jophus14

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    I am pulling up my carpet to lay down laminate flooring. While doing this I plan on painting all of my trim white. The trim that I currently have is the cheap MDF crap with grain imprinted on it. I know I will have to prime the trim before painting it and I was wondering if any of you have every taped and masked off the floor and walls and used a power sprayer to paint your trim while it was still nailed to the wall? I don't mind pulling all of the trim off but since I am doing the whole house (first and second floor) as well as the jambs, I though it would be easier to just paint it while on the wall. Also, should I paint the jambs and purchase just the doors or would it be better to purchase pre-hung doors? Thanks.
     
  2. Apr 21, 2010 #2

    knewshound

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    I think that by the time you mask off all the trim you could have had it already cut in.

    I often prime and finish paint my trim in the shop, pin nail it in, fill the holes and then only a quick brush after is all it takes to finish it.

    Cheers,

    knewshound
     
  3. Apr 21, 2010 #3

    handyguys

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    Okay, lots of comments on what you wrote....

    cool


    okay so far

    Yup, common

    Why? if its already been painted no priming will be required. Maybe a light sanding or good cleaning is all that's required. Sanding to knock down a gloss, cleaning to make sure its clean and the new paint sticks well.

    nope - too much work. Just a good 2 1/2" angled brush is all you need. Some painters tape if you dont have a steady hand. You will be done in less time that it would take to mask everything off, spray and clean up spray equipment.

    This is usually how its done.

    So you are doing new doors? Yeah, prehung will be easier to install. I paint them after they are up.

    Your welcome
     
  4. Apr 21, 2010 #4

    Jophus14

    Jophus14

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    Handyguys: Haha.....Great response.
    Knewshound: Thanks for the comment.

    I was thinking that brushing paint onto this cheap trim would leave nasty streaks and that is why I would spray it instead. If I pull up the carpet and tape the already painted walls above then maybe brushing wouldn't be so bad. So I shouldn't worry about priming the trim? I should just take some fine (200 grit) sandpaper to it to rough it up a bit? I planned on buying some white hollow six panel doors and replacing the even cheaper fake caramel color wood grain doors that I have now. It would be easier to replace the whole jamb rather than buy just the doors and hang them? I will have to cut the jamb regardless since I will be putting laminate down. Thanks again.
     
  5. Apr 21, 2010 #5

    handyguys

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    nah, cheap brushes and crappy paint leave streaks.

    Nope, unless its bare wood no need to prime.
    only if its glossy. If it isnt glossy just wash it with some TSP or spic and span.
    nope, I misunderstood your intention. Just do new door slabs. You will need to carefully mark and cut the new hinge mortises in the right place. Those doors will come pre-primed. I might paint them before installing them if I had some saw horses to use. I wouldn't pull off a door just to paint it tho.
     
  6. Apr 21, 2010 #6

    Jophus14

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    Thanks again. I will quickly sand the trim and paint it without taking it off the wall and just buy door slabs and not pre-hung doors. You just saved me some money. Any recommendation on paint or type of brush to use. I consider myself very knowledgable in home repair but I hate painting and taping/mudding drywall and those are the two projects that I am working on now....of course. I appreciate your advice and suggestions. Thanks.
     
  7. Apr 21, 2010 #7

    handyguys

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    I like any paint that isn't sold at a home center. Go to a specialty store. Benjamin Moore, Sherwin Williams, etc. Get their top of the line paint. They will make a recommendation on a decent brush that they carry that's best. Purdy is a top of the line brush.

    I hate painting and mudding too.
     
  8. Apr 21, 2010 #8

    Jophus14

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    I have to paint my ceiling since I just replaced some drywall. I'll use the same paint for both the ceiling and trim which I planned on getting from Benjamin Moore. Purdy brushes are sold at Lowe's, I used them before. I can't thank you enough for your help.
     
  9. Apr 21, 2010 #9

    handyguys

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    NOOOOO

    You typically use a flat paint on a ceiling. There are some ultra flat paints labeled on the can as ceiling paint. Benjamin Moore has such a product. Its much cheaper than their premium wall paint too.

    You typically use semi-gloss pain on trim. Semi-gloss is easier to clean and much more durable for all the bumps that trim takes.

    Buy trim paint and ceiling paint separately, to me they are very different products. Yeah, you can use semi-gloss on your ceiling but its going to show every imperfection in your drywall and it wont really feel or look right in my opinion.
     
  10. Apr 22, 2010 #10

    frozenstar

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    Wonderful advices you got there handyguys! :D *thumbsup* :beer:
     
  11. Apr 25, 2010 #11

    swindmill

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    I'm in the process of doing all the baseboard and door/window casing in my home. I paint it off the wall, but that's because I'm replacing it. It might not be practical if it's on the wall, and it would depend on what size the baseboard is (mine is 1x8), but I use a small foam roller on trim and doors. It gives a very smooth, almost manufactured finish.

    ...Of course, it also depends on the style of baseboard. All of my trim is 1x8 and 1x6 with edges rounded off with a router, so it's very easy to use a 4" roller.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2010
  12. Apr 26, 2010 #12

    Jophus14

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    Different change of plans. I ended up purchasing 3/4" oak flooring yesterday so I will have to take all of the trim off regardless. I started pulling off some of the trim last night to see how easy it would come off. The builder used 2" brad nails to nail the trim which seems a bit much. I originally thought that the trim was MDF but as it turns out, it's poplar with a grain imprinted on the face. I still appreciate all of the help I received on this thread. Also, I went to Sherwin Williams and those guys helped me out with paint for both my ceiling and the trim and it was cheaper than Ace Hardware and Lowe's.
     
  13. May 7, 2010 #13

    Lightingguru

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    Personally I think it is better to paint the trim while it is on the wall that way you can sand joint and do prep work to make the material look better. It is a good Idea to paint it with a sandable primer first.
     
  14. Jun 3, 2010 #14

    Jophus14

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    Here is another question regarding baseboard. I have to install shoe against my baseboard but the angles are not 45 degree cuts. Should I use a T-bevel to find the angles or is there an easier way? I planned on laying some painters tape on the floor along the baseboard, overlapping the edges where the baseboard on seperate walls meet and then drawing a line from the corner to the intersection of the tape and that should be my angle. I will then trace that angle onto the shoe and make my cut. Please see attached images.....horrible images I should say. Thanks.

    Wall03.jpg

    Wall02.jpg
     
  15. Jun 3, 2010 #15

    handyguys

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    There are angle finders made just for this purpose. Inside corners should be coped. Let us know if you need instructions on coping.
     
  16. Jun 4, 2010 #16

    Jophus14

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    I tried my method and failed. The angles were bowed and not necessarily straight even though the cuts were. I guess that is because the shoe is round on the edge. I would like to know more about coping. Thanks.
     
  17. Jun 4, 2010 #17

    Jophus14

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    HandyGuys: I am looking at how to cope base shoe on the internet and it seems pretty self explanatory. I'm not quite sure how to differentiate between angles but I'll try to accomplish this task tonight. If you can give any advice I would appreciate it.
     

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