Really bad house design

Discussion in 'Roofing and Siding' started by 1HandyWoman, Aug 3, 2013.

  1. Aug 3, 2013 #1

    1HandyWoman

    1HandyWoman

    1HandyWoman

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    I have a house that I swear was designed and built by an idiot. It is now 22 years old and literally falling apart at the seams and everywhere else. The question/problem I have today that I can't figure out is this.

    The house is build on a cement slab, the slab extends out from the foundation on two sides (side and back of house) and is level with the foundation. This means that the sill of the house is sitting at the same level as the "outside" slab so when it rains the water runs down the house, hits the slab and rolls under the sill and rots out the sill, the siding, and the trim that have all been installed down to the slab. I hope this is understandable I have added pictures below.

    Now I have removed the rotting trim, siding, etc and can see rot of the sill board happening. What can I do BEFORE I replace the siding and trim to keep water from running under the siding and trim and rotting it AGAIN and further rotting out the sill board, etc?

    Any idea without just demolishing this whole stinking house?

    Stairs rot 001.jpg

    Stairs rot 002.jpg

    Stairs rot 003.jpg
     
  2. Aug 4, 2013 #2

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

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    1HW, I think you need to dig a lil deeper and remove that board that has Celotex stamped all over it. Now is the time to make sure you are not covering up a unforseen problem.
     
  3. Aug 4, 2013 #3

    Drywallinfo

    Drywallinfo

    Drywallinfo

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    I see your problem: Water freely flows to your sill. We had a similar problem with a slab under steps that actually tilted toward our home and channeled water toward our basement wall. I removed the slab and landscaped so I had a very good grade away from the house. I think you need to do the same - hire someone to cut that slab fairly close to your house, remove the outside part, and then landscape so you have good water drainage away. If you have overhangs or eaves above, this could then keep much of the water away from your sill. Add gutters if you do not already have them and extend your downspouts a good 4-8 ft away from your house.
     

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