Sagging Basement Ceiling

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by fowens, Dec 28, 2017.

  1. Dec 28, 2017 #1

    fowens

    fowens

    fowens

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    To start, apologies if this is a redundant post. But, I haven't found a lot of success with my specific situation.

    Our home is a rancher with a basement.

    We have started removing some drywall and studs for a basement remodel we are doing. We noticed that the ceiling was sagging before we removed the existing 2x4's. They did not appear to be load bearing.

    Ideally, I would like to fix the slight sag, about 1/4" spanning approx 5' 10", in the basement ceiling/upstairs floor.

    Our plan was to add 2x6s to the existing span and jack them up into place, get them level and it would fix the sag. The pictures are of the span with the sag.

    The research I have done appears that you will need to fix this with small adjustments over time.

    I'm hoping someone here has the expertise to help us so we can get this done and then move forward with our project.

    Pic 1 - With the drywall removed
    Pic 2 - Studs removed

    Thanks in advance.

    Drywall removed.jpg

    studs removed.jpg
     
  2. Dec 28, 2017 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    That sure looks like a load bearing wall that should not have been removed with out a plan.:hide:
     
  3. Dec 28, 2017 #3

    fowens

    fowens

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    Ok, if this is a mistake, would you suggest replacing it all with what was there? Or something else?

    The door header wasn't bearing any load at all and it is what led me to believe removing it would be fine. Am I wrong here?

    Also, I've attempted to get multiple contractors out. None of them are willing to consult, even for a fee.
     
  4. Dec 28, 2017 #4

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    You can check and see if the ceiling joists are landing on the top plates.
    If they are a joist is 1 1/2" wide. if you can slide something thin up there beside the 2x4s. If you find material that is 3" wide that would indicate 2 or meeting on the wall and they need to be supported.

    If it is bearing and you still want it open, that should be somewhat doable.
     
  5. Dec 28, 2017 #5

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

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    Pay visit to your local building office and ask if the original plans for the dwelling are on file, the record of all permits pulled for the dwelling and who the builder was.
     
  6. Dec 28, 2017 #6

    Sparky617

    Sparky617

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    You'd really need to see what is going on above the drywall to know if it is load bearing. The header over the door, if it was load bearing was pretty poorly designed as it was only supported by the jack studs and didn't include anything but the door area. But without seeing above the drywall it is anyone's guess as to what is going on.
     
  7. Dec 28, 2017 #7

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

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    1/4" in 70" equals 1 in 280 and is an L/280 deflection.

    "Typical deflection limits referenced in code books are L/360, L/240 or L/180."

    I'm not so sure this needs fixing.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2017
  8. Dec 28, 2017 #8

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Discuss the sag after you figure out if the floor is being held up with anything more than a wish.
     
    aNYCdb likes this.
  9. Jan 3, 2018 #9

    fowens

    fowens

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    The wall is load bearing and it wasn't actually being supported by the header at all. There was a small gap between the head and the jack studs.

    We ended up placing two 2x6s up there and jacking them up to help the sag. This ended up fixing the creaking floor and minimized the sag in the floor. It appears to be much stronger than before.

    I appreciate everyone's input.
     

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