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Spackling/Taping issues...Plz help

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nick62388

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I have had plenty of experience over the years with spackling and taping....But even after all the research and practice I am still horrible and can't get it down right..... I figure I should have turned to the forums first!

My latest project I cut a hole in the wall and a hole in the ceiling to fish wire through for hooking up a fan in the ceiling. I used the cutouts from the drywall for when I patched up the wall to spackle.

I can't post pictures until I make 1 post, so pics coming whenever I'm allowed. But after placing the cutouts back in wall/ceiling, I spackled over it and let it dry.....

The next day, being the spackle was a little rough from the first coat and the cut being a little jaggedy, I sanded slightly.....I then threw more mud over the cutout, put paper tape over the cutout, and layed more spackled over the tape and let it dry......

The next day, it needed a tad bit more sanding, but as I was sanding after the second coat of spackle, the tape started to show thru faintly....I had no choice but to lay more spackle down on the wall which will need more sanding.....


WHAT AM I DOING WRONG, PLEASE HELP, SEND SOME GUIDANCE ADVICE, BECAUSE I have practiced and practiced for years with spackling holes, taping with paper tape and I am still beyond horrible, if its not flat spackle jobs, its the tape showing through after sanding.
 

Snoonyb

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Welcome.
There are a myriad of UTUBE videos about this and several discussions here-in, however this is how I address this.

1. A butterfly which is a piece of drywall larger than that removed. On the backside the removed piece is replicated and cut, not thru, just scored. The portion outside the scored area is peeled away, leaving the surface paper, which is then mudded on the backside and the patch is installed and troweled smooth. When used on a ceiling a piece of 1x is first fitted within the hole and secured, and the butterfly is also secured with a screw. I use dry mix 5 or 20min. mud so a 2nd coat is applied in minutes, and a finish applied after slight, if any, sanding. Prime and paint.

2. Using a drywall sew cut the hole at a 45 degree angle, install a 1x backing, mud both the 45 edges, screw in place mud over, finish trowel, sand slightly, prime and paint.

There is a slight, marginal, learning curve.
 

mikejurasw

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My system: I use old lath from either my walls or bundles people discard in the neighborhood when they go "down to studs" in these 1920's homes. I cut a piece 6 inches or so, pre-drill two holes in the center about an inch apart, and run a piece of twine through, tying it off so it's a closed loop.
For a smallish hole, I widen enough to slide the lath inside the wall, holding the twine to not lose the lath. Pulling with good tension on this, I drive two drywall screws through the good plaster/drywall and into the lath (have your drill and screws handy). Aim right, and it'll suck it right up tight to the inside of the wall, closing the hole and sinking the screw-heads. Then, plaster/mud and off you go.
A little hard to describe...a picture would show instantly. It's like the butterfly, but a little more sturdy.

Good luck!
 

Jeff Handy

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Use mesh tape, it is more forgiving for amateur drywall repairs.
Don’t sand through it!

Yes, install a piece or pieces of wood behind the opening that you cut, held with screws outside the hole.
3/8 plywood scraps are great, and don’t split like lath or 1x2 will always do.
You can also cut drywall scraps as backers, but much weaker, slower, and tend not to suck down the screw heads.

You have to use joint compound, not spackle.
And make your coats much wider, because this is a butt joint.
For amateurs, use the premixed, low dust type.

You will need three light coats.
Trying to cheat with one or two coats is why it turns out like crap.

You should have at least an eight inch wide band of compound over the tape, which you can feather down til almost flat, and still keep the tape covered.

Pros go about 1.5 feet wide, on long butt joints.
You can go less on a repair, if you sand carefully and feather artfully.

A skinny little band of spackle or compound will never look flat.
 

Johnboy555

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I have been repairing holes in dywall for over 40 years. If the hole is over 2' x 2' use tape, paper or mesh. Less than that I don't use tape. If I am the one that cuts the hole I do it this way...
Try to avoid joists/studs (they are structural and will move) Leave at least 1 1/2" to new hole. I use my multi tool (Fein) to cut the hole. It's easy to control, very little dust and very small kerf. Also much less chance of damage to unseen wires or piping. If repairing hole, I make a new patch out of new drywall and draw around it, and carefully cut out the hole.
Then screw 1 x 3's all around the edges of the hole to support the patch. Make sure that the DW behind is clean so the 1 x 3 lays flat. Before I install the patch I take a screwdriver, tape measure, or whatever is handy to "roll over" the edges of the patch AND hole so they are not sticking up and slightly recessed to the surface. I then use a "setting-type" of wall compound such as "Easy sand lightweight setting type joint compound by USG" (It comes in different setting times, 5 min. and 20 min) For a newbie I'd recomend the 20 min., the 5 min REALLY sets in 5 min. Push it deep into the hole seams and strike it flush with the taping knife. In about 10 min, for "5 Min, 30 for 20 min compound, you can use the knife to scrape it flush, if any touch up in needed you can mix a little batch and touch it up, or even use some spackle. A little primer and you're set for finish paint.
I've never had one "crack out" on me.
FYI Unless you're a Pro you shouldn't be using a setting-type compound for general taping. They set hard and don't really sand easily. But they so work well for repairs.

Most of these You Tube videos are well meaning and most are fine but by the time you've "butterflied" a drywall patch I'm done and out the door. It's a cute idea, but unnecessary.
 

Jeff Handy

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I would add that instead of rolling over the edges, you can just shave a slight bevel with a razor knife.

That removes all the raggedy fuzzy stuff that might stick up into the finished joint.
 

EricK

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Nick, man am I with you on the learning curve for patching holes. I work as a handyman and it's taken me a few years to get pretty good at it. Here's what I've learned. Snoonyb is right on regarding the butterfly patch. Sometimes it's called a California patch. You can look it up on YouTube. I recommend doing that. Here's a few other tips. The trick to getting a smooth transition from the patch to the rest of the wall is to go wide. Sometimes we think that the smaller the patch the better it'll look. In fact, it's just the opposite. If you are patching a hole that is 6 in in diameter, you want to spread the mud as you patch at least twice that far. This allows you to feather the patch in the best. Now when you are adding texture do 150% of that space. This way, the texture will blend in best. I don't know what kind of texture you have on the wall. If you have the orange peel finish, I have to admit the Homex stuff in the can works really well for me. It's a little expensive, but my time costs more so it's worth it. If you use that I've learned to start with a finer spray and then slowly work your way up to match the texture on the wall. If you have a bigger, knockdown texture, I find simply crumpling up some paper (the thick grocery bag paper works best) and dabbing it on the wall works. Wait 10 to 15 minutes for it to gel up and then gently knock it down with your blade. You'll have to practice to get the right angle. And if it doesn't turn out well you can always scrape it off and start over again. Matching texture is really an art. Be patient with yourself and you'll get it. I find the Vancouver Carpenter on YouTube to be a great resource for things like this.
 

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