Spot-treating bubbling/peeling lead paint

Discussion in 'Painting Forum' started by bh_homeowner, Feb 20, 2017.

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  1. Feb 20, 2017 #1

    bh_homeowner

    bh_homeowner

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    I just bought a house that was built in 1921 (2 br, 1 ba, 1000 sq. ft.). I've already confirmed lead paint in a number of areas that I already suspected due to the age of the home. The interior paint is in excellent condition, except for a few problem areas. I have a peeling spots in the bathroom of roughly 36 sq. in. and I have some bubbling paint on a section of molding in the living room also about 36 sq. in. No kids, just my fiancée and I.

    I wanted to spot-treat the problem areas. What kind of precautions do I need to take to limit dust and exposure for just those areas? Do I need to cover everything/move everything out of the room, clean up with a HEPA vacuum, seal off doorways, etc.? I'm pretty OCD about most things, and would like to keep any lead contamination to a minimum. Initially, I was thinking about wet-scraping/sanding, then priming, then repainting. But, now I'm also considering chemically-stripping those areas.

    Thoughts?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Feb 20, 2017 #2

    Snoonyb

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    Small areas are fairly easy to correct with wet sanding, and for the bathroom prime all the walls and ceilings with a transitional primer before repainting. The same will work for the small area of molding.
     
  3. Feb 21, 2017 #3

    bh_homeowner

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    Great. Thanks!

    So, since it's less than 6 square feet, no need to take any extra lead-related precautions, right?
     
  4. Feb 21, 2017 #4

    chrisn

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    You need to be cautious(somewhat) if it's one square inch
     
  5. Feb 21, 2017 #5

    Snoonyb

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    Not at all.

    What ever makes you comfortable.

    I quoted you the method I would use, however I've been stripping, sanding and refinishing many finishes for over 60yrs. and have only occasionally used a dust mask or respirator, and never a hazmat suit.
     
  6. Feb 24, 2017 #6

    slownsteady

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    Use a putty knife to scrape back to where the adhesion is good. Expect the problem spot to expand a bit. You don't want to create dust, but the paint chips are relatively safe. Wear a simple dust mask if you want to, and vacuum thoroughly when you're finished scraping.
     
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  7. Feb 24, 2017 #7

    chrisn

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    Is this not the reason for all the lead paint hype, ie, eating paint chips?
    Do not let your children chew on trim and or eat paint chips, problem solved.
     
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  8. Feb 24, 2017 #8

    slownsteady

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    Ok, I admit that I assumed there were no children involved. :hide:And I also assumed that any good parent would know this automatically. My bad.
    I meant that the lead would be contained if there was no dust created - as in sanding - and I did mention to clean up the chips
     

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