Tree Stump Removal

Discussion in 'Garden and Lawncare' started by thailen, May 4, 2011.

  1. May 4, 2011 #1

    thailen

    thailen

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    I have a large(Magnolia) tree stump about 3 ft in diameter) I need to remove. I know I can rent a stump grinker from Home Depot and can chop it up with a chain saw. Are there any products I can buy to do the job? I'm thinking about cutting out a hole in the center and planting something to slowly eat the wood(can't use explosives, because it's in front of the house, 3 feet away from the street and sidewalk). Any suggestions?
     
  2. May 5, 2011 #2

    joecaption

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    Far faster and cheaper to just hire someone that already owns a stump grinder. By the time you get back from doing all the paper work to rent one they could be done and gone.
     
  3. May 5, 2011 #3

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    Forget the chain saw, the chain will be so dull in so short a time, all your time will be spend getting it sharpened. Tree roots have lots of sand in them.
     
  4. Aug 9, 2011 #4

    mrrobinson

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    i agree with joecaption, a stump grinder is the most logical and easy way to go.
     
  5. Aug 9, 2011 #5

    EdiblePlanet

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    For smaller trees (less than 2 feet in diameter) we usually just dig around the stump and cut the exposed roots continuing until we can rock the stump to get at the tap root but for trees larger that 2 ft diameter hiring someone with a stump grinder is definitely the way to go. Good luck,

    Scott
     
  6. Feb 17, 2012 #6

    drunkenDIY

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    If you were willing to plant something in the center while it slowly rots away, I'm guessing you're in no hurry.... It's a slower method, but you can drill holes into the top of the stump using a 1" boring/spade bit, and then fill them with a stump remover chemical (Home Depot carries one by Spectracide), that essentially simulates rot. Eventually the stump will dissolve enough that you can pull hunks of it out, and fill in with dirt/cover with sod.
     
  7. Feb 21, 2012 #7

    BridgeMan

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    Drill a series of 1"-dia. +/- holes every 5" or 6", fill them with lawn fertilizer that has a high nitrogen content, cover with a tarp, and come back in a few months to shovel up the remains.
     
  8. Feb 26, 2012 #8

    poonald

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    I've read about pioneers who would dig all around the edges 5 or 6 inches inches below the ground level of the stump and then pile brush, downed limbs and burnable scrapwood on top for a bonfire. I've done this in my yard a number of times and it works fine, but is obviously not as fast as a grinder.

    You have to get a really hot fire going for a few hours but it will burn the stump down below the ground level and then you can remove the ashes, fill it with loam and throw some grass seed on it.
     
  9. Feb 26, 2012 #9

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    I've done that too, but it took weeks and a lot of firewood. These were Oak stumps, the last one that I'm referring to was green and about 24" in diameter.
     

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