Vinyl siding to cover wood

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albertkao9

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The current small exterior wood area around the bay window at the second level of my home is deteriorating (see photos).
Instead of repainting and repairing it, I am thinking of getting vinyl siding that looks like wood.
The new vinyl siding will cover the current wood area.
Its thickness is at least 0.044 inches (1.11 mm). Its width will be D5.
Any comments about this idea?
 

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Skeezix

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Rather than scrape and repaint the wooden siding, soffits, eaves, and fascia every 7-8 years I decided to cover it with vinyl siding. That was in 2005. It's still looking great after 12+ years. Cost was $7K. Cost to scrape and repaint was $6K (it's a 2-story house with wood siding on the upper floor and that was in 1998). The siding covers the soffits, eaves and fascia too.
$ well spent!
 

Sparky617

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If it were me, I'd replace the wood with a combination of AZEK cellular PVC and Hardi-panel fiber cement. I did this for a friend years ago and it still looks great. Use the AZEK for the 1x trim and the Hardi-panel for the flat panels.
 

jerrydorm81422

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If it were me, I'd replace the wood with a combination of AZEK cellular PVC and Hardi-panel fiber cement. I did this for a friend years ago and it still looks great. Use the AZEK for the 1x trim and the Hardi-panel for the flat panels.
why do you prefer using this combination of materials?
 

Sparky617

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why do you prefer using this combination of materials?
Unlike wood they don't rot, and take paint extremely well. The finished product will look like the original with none of the downsides. Slapping vinyl on it will IMHO look like a bandaid. Also, if you don't remove and replace any wood with rot you're just burying the problem and not fixing it. The rot will continue into the structure.
 

LMHmedchem

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Several years ago my parents decided to have their 150 year old house covered in vinyl siding because it needed to be painted nearly every year to look decent. Even though all the wood shingles had been replaced (some more than once) they just wouldn't hold either stain or paint for very long. I advised removing all of the old wood shingles and carefully inspecting for insect damage and rot before installing the siding, but the contractor said that he had checked out everything and it was fine. It turns out that all he did was walk around and stick a screwdriver up under the shingles in a few places.

There are now two places on the house that have massive termite damage. In some places, the ledger beams have completely disintegrated. These were 6"x8" beams and I removed part of one with a vacuum cleaner. It looks like the termites came up through a post under the porch and worked their way through the framing. If I had not added some framing to the porch a while ago I am sure that it would have collapsed. You would not believe the damage. I will post some pictures if I have a chance but there really isn't much to take a picture of, the wood is literally just sawdust and wood chips.

The house was inspected for termites about 3 years ago when an exterminator was called in to take care of an issue with mice. He didn't find anything. The issue is that they can be inside the wood with no external signs to speak of. You really need to drill into the beams to make sure that they are ok. This is a major issue with covering over old wood with vinyl and aluminum wrapping. You just can't see what is going on underneath.

Regardless of what type of siding you use, I would remove old wood underneath before installing it. I would use ground contact pressure treated wood for anything near the ground or foundation and I would douse other exposed wood with oil based copper naphthenate before covering it up. I also use pressure treated plywood for the first row of plywood on the outside.

Products like Azek and Hardy fiber board are great as they don't have this vulnerability, but you cant build the structure with these. While you have things opened up, make sure that the structure underneath is sound and well treated. I would never advise anyone to put vinyl on over old wood. I was against it before and my experience tells me that I was correct to be concerned.

I realize that this is not just an issue of how the siding was applied. I could have removed all the old wood and treated the new wood and still had a problem. Insects can be difficult to deal with even when you do everything right. I think removing old siding before replacement gives you a chance to do a proper inspection and treat the framing and this gives you the best chance of avoiding a major problem. This is even more important if insect damage is common where you live.

Needless to say I am a bit sensitized to hearing someone suggest putting vinyl over old wood and calling it a day.

LMHmedchem
 

ekrig

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Sparky617

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