Water Stain on Ceiling

Discussion in 'Painting Forum' started by notsob23, Jul 29, 2018.

Help Support House Repair Talk by donating:

  1. Jul 29, 2018 #1

    notsob23

    notsob23

    notsob23

    New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Montana
    I had a water stain on my bathroom ceiling from a roof leak. The leak has since been fixed, but I mistakenly tried to paint over the water stain with regular paint, didn't realize the stain will still show through. After a quick google search, I realized I should have put on a stain blocking primer first before painting. After my initial paint started cracking, I tried to peel it off, but made it worse.

    Can I still use the stain blocking primer on my current ceiling (picture attached), and then paint over it? Or are there other steps I need to take now since I have made it worse in order to paint over it? Thank you in advance for any advice.
    IMG_5809.JPG
     
  2. Jul 29, 2018 #2

    Eddie_T

    Eddie_T

    Eddie_T

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2015
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    10
    I have successfully done it with a large moldy stain.. I first washed the area with an orange based cleaner and let it dry for a day or so then used Zinsser Bulls Eye 1-2-3 to seal it. I think in the past I have used white wood glue to seal a small stain.
     
  3. Jul 29, 2018 #3

    notsob23

    notsob23

    notsob23

    New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Montana
    Thanks for the reply Eddie. So you think even though I chipped away some of the layers of paint on this ceiling, I can still spray it with the stain blocking primer and then paint over it? Thanks again.
     
  4. Jul 29, 2018 #4

    Eddie_T

    Eddie_T

    Eddie_T

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2015
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    10
    I think it's worth trying. If the chipping is noticeable you might try a thin coat of spackle (after sealing it) to smooth it .
     
  5. Jul 29, 2018 #5

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,642
    Likes Received:
    675
    If you use an oil based primer the edges will curl. Sand and remove to an adhered are then prime and paint.
     
  6. Jul 29, 2018 #6

    notsob23

    notsob23

    notsob23

    New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Montana
    Thanks for the replies. What type of sandpaper can I use for ceilings? What grit level? Sorry if this question is stupid, but I’m not very handy. Thank you.
     
  7. Jul 29, 2018 #7

    Eddie_T

    Eddie_T

    Eddie_T

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2015
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    10
    Good point! I forgot to mention that the Zinsser I used was water based. Sanding a broader area is a good idea and would negate the need for spackle. In my case it was a textured ceiling.
     
  8. Jul 29, 2018 #8

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,642
    Likes Received:
    675
    Sandpaper is, generally, not surface specific, use 220 grit to avoid gouging the surface. The idea is to just remove and smooth to a stable or securely attached surface.
     
  9. Jul 30, 2018 #9

    mabloodhound

    mabloodhound

    mabloodhound

    Restoration & Renovations

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2008
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    76
    220 grit is going to fill up fast and become useless. I use 100 grit and then after sealing with the paint I go over it with a skim coat of wallboard compound and paint again.
     
  10. Jul 31, 2018 #10

    greenlady0

    greenlady0

    greenlady0

    greenlady0

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2011
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exactly what I would recommend for the best finished result
     
  11. Jul 31, 2018 #11

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Snoonyb

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2006
    Messages:
    3,642
    Likes Received:
    675
    Absolutely, add 2 or 3 steps, unnecessarily.
     
  12. Jul 31, 2018 #12

    joecaption

    joecaption

    joecaption

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2011
    Messages:
    2,294
    Likes Received:
    380
    Spackle is for filling small holes like nail holes, drywall compound is what's used for larger areas like what your dealing with.
    It looks like even some of the paper has been removed, if so then all the loose stuff needs to be removed and it's going to need a skim coat of drywall compound.
    Thin coats work best, I'd use at least a 6" wide knife.
    Once dry scrape over it to remove any high places, wipe down to remove any dust, and go over it again.
    Once that's dry it can be sanded with a medium sanding sponge in a cirular motion.
    Run your hand over it to feel for flaws and take the time to fill in any low areas.
    Always wipe off the area that's been sanded, paint will not stick to drywall dust.
    No amount of primer or paint is going to make flaws go away.
     
  13. Aug 1, 2018 #13

    slownsteady

    slownsteady

    slownsteady

    Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2009
    Messages:
    6,848
    Likes Received:
    1,281
    Location:
    Sussex County, NJ
    I'm pretty sure that Spackle is just a brand name for drywall compound, but other than that, Joe has got a good method there.
     

Share This Page