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Snoonyb

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Two options;
1. cut it out and replace it.
2. caulk over it.

Or, you could describe the intersecting materials, Or, provide a more panoramic photo, so that we might possibly be able to discern that.
 

oldognewtrick

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Dig it all out, clean the surfaces, apply new caulk. Silicone caulk won't stick to old silicone caulk. Make sure the is no moisture migration from the exterior. Surfaces move as you go through season cycles and they don't always move at the same rate. Use a flexible caulk that will allow for movement.
 

Steve123

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Use an acrylic caulk labelled "window and door", not pure silicone. Often, it will be labeled as "siliconized", which means just a tiny proportion of silicone (but supposedly does help performance).
 

Jdeal1

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Use an acrylic caulk labelled "window and door", not pure silicone. Often, it will be labeled as "siliconized", which means just a tiny proportion of silicone (but supposedly does help performance).
Will removing the caulk strip the paint of the wall of the window sill?
 

kok328

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Will removing the caulk strip the paint of the wall of the window sill?
Possibly. Cut it out with a razor knife. Reapply a generous bead and smooth out with your finger. It appears that some settling or expansion has occurred here causing the caulk to stretch and break.
 

Jeff Handy

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You can cut it out with a razor knife, but it often is easier to get under it with a sharp flat scraper, like a paint scraper or a 3 in 1 tool.
You will probably need several different tools.
Even a flat screwdriver might be needed to dig out caulk here and there.
Some looser sections can probably be peeled out like a rope, after you cut under the edges.

Dust everything off, vacuum or use a leaf blower, then wipe down the surfaces with a smooth rag like an old t shirt, moistened well with rubbing alcohol.
It cleans up dirt and dust, new caulk won’t stick to crud.

Yes, the old paint will get chewed up.
After a few days of curing, you should do touch up painting.

Use an exterior caulk that is labeled as paintable.
 

rbm328

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when smoothing out the caulk, you can use your finger (keep finger wet, caulk wont stick), OR pick up some popsicle sticks and use them, wiping off excess from stick as you move along. but yes, remove as much old caulk as possible, using what ever means you have ie. putty knife, knife. once you remove all possible, wipe it out with dry cloth or blow out area if you have a compressor.
 

tomtheelder2020

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6 years old should not be showing this kind of deterioration. Trying to figure our why it happend might help knowing what/how to fix so it doesn't recurr. Olddognewtrick is right to check for evidence of moisture migration from exterior. If what kok328 is suggesting is structural movement, I would expect drywall cracks - are there any? Is that mold in the corners? If so, a sure sign of moisture where it shouldn't be and you had better figure out and eliminate the source. Might the caulk have been placed on dirty surface, causing it to loosen? I am not familiar with new construction but that caulk bead seems awfully thick - can anyone say if that looks normal for new construction these days?
 

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