61" bathroom to 60"

Discussion in 'Walls and Ceilings' started by swindmill, Jan 13, 2014.

  1. Jan 13, 2014 #1

    swindmill

    swindmill

    swindmill

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Messages:
    214
    Likes Received:
    14
    I'm remodeling a bathroom with the tub against the back wall. The old tub was 61", and the new tub is a standard 60". The walls around the tub will get CBU and tile. The tub is in place but I need to fur out the right hand wall an inch (lefthand tub). I'm look for ideas on how to best handle this. Everything I can think of is 3/4 or 1/2.
     
  2. Jan 13, 2014 #2

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

    Well-Known Member Sponsor

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,471
    Likes Received:
    175
    Long shim strips?
     
  3. Jan 13, 2014 #3

    swindmill

    swindmill

    swindmill

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Messages:
    214
    Likes Received:
    14
    I'm hoping to just shim out each stud 1", I just don't know what material to use. I don't have a table saw that will allow me to rip my own strips, so I'm stuck using stock material. If there's nothing available, it may just be time to get a decent table saw. I'd like to have one, so if I have to get one...
     
  4. Jan 13, 2014 #4

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    23,899
    Likes Received:
    3,119
    Pick up a half sheet of 1" plywood or rip 2x4 down to get 1 1/2 x1 strips.
     
  5. Jan 14, 2014 #5

    swindmill

    swindmill

    swindmill

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Messages:
    214
    Likes Received:
    14
    I guess I've never looked for 1" plywood, but if the big box stores carry it, that would work.
     
  6. Jan 14, 2014 #6

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

    Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2009
    Messages:
    10,820
    Likes Received:
    1,435
    Or a double layer of 1/2"...
     
  7. Jan 14, 2014 #7

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    23,899
    Likes Received:
    3,119
    If the wall come out and stop at an outside corner, where you might want to put up corner bead for drywall, don't use plywood , it messes up with the screws for the cornerbead.
     
  8. Jan 14, 2014 #8

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2010
    Messages:
    1,651
    Likes Received:
    594
    Your best bet is to cut 1" shims from a 2x6. Put two of them side by side to create a steady base for the skill saw as you cut the strips.

    Now you will have a good shim for corner bead nailing. This is better than buying milled 1" casing ... and a lot cheaper!

    Tub-framing.jpg
     
  9. Jan 14, 2014 #9

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

    Fixer Upper Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    Messages:
    4,663
    Likes Received:
    1,602
    I nail my corner bead on and haven’t had any issues with plywood or OSB even. I just use drywall nails as the heads are so thin they don’t stick up and don’t bend the bead like screws will want to.

    Without a table saw it’s still not so hard to rip stock with a hand circular saw if you take your time. I often screw a guide strip to the piece I’m ripping similar to what Villa suggests. I find a nice straight piece of trim wood works better than a 2X as the 2X has a round corner and my saw wants to get stuck in that corner. I bought a thing called a workmate last summer at a garage sale and I love it for holding a long piece to rip like this.

    I would cut two strips of half as oldog suggests.
     
  10. Jan 14, 2014 #10

    swindmill

    swindmill

    swindmill

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Messages:
    214
    Likes Received:
    14
    I could rip 2x with some clamps and a guide. Doubling up 1/2" would work too. I'll be going with one of those options in the next few days.
     
  11. Jan 14, 2014 #11

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

    Fixer Upper Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    Messages:
    4,663
    Likes Received:
    1,602
    I guess I would look at it as to what I have laying around. I always have a pile of edges of half inch plywood stacked up because I can’t force myself to toss a 12 inch x 8 foot piece of 4ply out. But if I had to go buy a sheet to just rip some shim strips off of I would go with the 2X as it’s much cheaper.
     
  12. Jan 14, 2014 #12

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

    Well-Known Member Sponsor

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,471
    Likes Received:
    175
    I finally bought a saw guide and I should have done it a long time ago. Little blocks of plywood will prevent the guide clamps from marring the wood you are cutting.
    It's also a great straightedge.

    For fine adjustments on your project I recommend shoebox cardboard shims but you may want to waterproof them first.

    As to buying a table saw, figure out how much your travel time and convenience are worth and foresee how often you will need to do ripping and crosscuts in the near future.
    As a gift I got a Harbor Freight sliding compound miter saw and that comes in pretty handy, too. It brings out the shortcomings of just having a table saw or a circular saw.

    As you get better you may want vernier adjustments on your equipment.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2014
  13. Jan 15, 2014 #13

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

    CallMeVilla

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2010
    Messages:
    1,651
    Likes Received:
    594
    Guess who got to cut 1 3/8" strips from a 2x6 today freehand with by skill saw? Coincidence but true. Didn't take pics but I did it using the technique I described (above) to create shims for a fireplace trim repair.

    So, it CAN be done ... Just remember what they taught you in school: "Stay in the lines."

    KID.jpg
     
  14. Jan 15, 2014 #14

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    23,899
    Likes Received:
    3,119
    Every saw comes with a rip fence and if if you are making a narrow cut just start the cut and clamp your finger on the nose of the saw, Your finger can be the fence. Watch out for slivers.:beer:
     
    CallMeVilla likes this.
  15. Jan 15, 2014 #15

    swindmill

    swindmill

    swindmill

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Messages:
    214
    Likes Received:
    14
    I'll probably give a freehand rip a try and see how it goes. I can follow a chalk line fine, but it's easy to move an 1/8 one way or the other when you change your footing as you make your way down an 8' cut.
     
  16. Jan 16, 2014 #16

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

    oldognewtrick

    Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2009
    Messages:
    10,820
    Likes Received:
    1,435
    Clamp a 2X to the plywood to act as a guide.
     
  17. Jan 16, 2014 #17

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    23,899
    Likes Received:
    3,119
    If you no longer have the rip fence for the saw. Drill a couple holes in the base of your saw and screw a peice of would to use as a fence, make sure it straight with the blade.

    rip fence 1.png

    rip fence 2.png

    rip fence 5.jpg

    rip fence 6.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2014
  18. Jan 16, 2014 #18

    swindmill

    swindmill

    swindmill

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Messages:
    214
    Likes Received:
    14
    If it came with a rip fence, I must have it somewhere. I'll look around for something that looks like it might be it.

    It's looking like I will be ripping from 2x6.
     
    nealtw likes this.
  19. Jan 16, 2014 #19

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

    Wuzzat?

    Well-Known Member Sponsor

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,471
    Likes Received:
    175
    Decide which is worse, undersized or oversized.
    I hate forcing things or using a plane or sandpaper or a rasp so if you can cut accurately to +/- 1/16" then cut it 1/16" undersized and shim and caulk.
    No one can hit it perfectly, especially in this application.

    Also, you can easily make a cardboard mockup.

    In general, make your marks with an Exacto knife rather than a pencil or pen. The accuracy can only get worse from your mark.
     
  20. Jan 16, 2014 #20

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    23,899
    Likes Received:
    3,119
    With a fence you cut one peice, if wrong toss it adjust the fence and keep cutting.
    In this case a little big would be fine.
     

Share This Page