Base & Shoe W/ Transition Pieces - Need Help!!

Discussion in 'Flooring' started by 1simple, Feb 25, 2008.

  1. Feb 25, 2008 #1

    1simple

    1simple

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    Here is my problem, see pictures attached for clarity. My laminate is 1/4" higher than the tile, because of the cork underlayment. I have included two pictures. I do not know how to do the baseboards and shoe molding to make this look right. The only solution I know of or can come up with is this:

    You would take out the shoe molding on the left side of the transition piece, caulk the bottom gap below base board and paint it. The rest of the base board in that area touching the tile only, would be laid directly on top of the tile, like the walls the umbrella are touching in the second picture. So there will be shoe molding throughout the whole house, except where there is tile.

    Also, side note, the upstairs bathrooms where there is tile, already have shoe molding. Leave those there? I don't think this is something anyone would ever be able to notice, shoe molding on this tile, but not on the downstairs tile or even snap to it?

    Please know the room picture attached is older, as the transitions pieces are already glued down.

    PS: I know, the corner on the base board isn't good, stupid wall.... :) Caulk will fix it just fine, I think.

    Thanks for your help and opinions!

    Curtis

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  2. Feb 26, 2008 #2

    triple D

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    This looks like a true d.i.y. job. I think you could have two ways out here. Option one could be cut back transition strip to allow shoe to run continuously along wall and strip would butt up to base shoe. Option two might be to use a coping saw and cut bottom of shoe to match contour of top of transition. I think either of these options will allow a decent solution to your problem. Good luck....Lets see a finished picture.
     
  3. Feb 26, 2008 #3

    1simple

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    That's the thing, the laminate is 1/4" higher! See the attached image, I think this would be the best solution. The transition pieces are already glued down.... The other two images, are another corner I have done, which was a test run as the shoes are simply taped up there, to see how it would look???

    Thanks!
    Curtis

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  4. Feb 26, 2008 #4

    handyguys

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    Sorry if this offends anyone. The first thing that came to mind when looking at these pictures....

    "A little caulk, a little paint, makes a carpenter what he ain't!"

    Sorry I don't have any better advice. I think you may be way too deep and past the point of return for making this look right.

    Last picture in above post. First off you need to make the tops of the 1/4 round line up, that may mean two different sized 1/4rounds BUT they need the same radius. They also need to be snug to the tile and the wood. How? You need to rip one down a quarter. Do it in one piece if possible so you don't have a joint there. Then cope the transition piece to sit snug against the 1/4 round.

    Good luck.
     
  5. Feb 26, 2008 #5

    Hack

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    Tough situation...

    I'm a glutton for punishment, so I probably would have made a taller piece and rounded the top over for the lower section of floor. You could also use an "extended" quarter round for both parts, and just cut the bottom off where you need to...

    I made some drawings :rolleyes:

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  6. Feb 26, 2008 #6

    1simple

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    Awesome, thanks for the drawings! Extended quarter round, what is that? I don't remember seeing any extra quarter rounds at Lowes or HomeDepot. I have shoe molding, doesn't quarter round look much different.

    Or are you basically saying to use a piece of wood underneath to make a one whole piece straight look instead of caulking that will not be as perfect?
     
  7. Feb 26, 2008 #7

    Hack

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    You could do that, too.

    Myself, I'm nuts, so I would probably buy a piece of stock that is the correct height and width and use a router to create the 1/4 round at the top :rolleyes:

    Of course, I'd look for a piece like that first :eek:
     
  8. Feb 26, 2008 #8

    1simple

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    My question is, do you think it will look good, to have that piece of shoe molding so much taller than the rest? Once it is caulked real good & painted, think it will look good? It wont stick out as a sore thumb to most people that come in & see the house or if you were ever to sell it? Also, what about where it goes over like in the other pictures, where the transition piece is cut into the molding itself? I just want this to look good & professional.
     
  9. Feb 26, 2008 #9

    handyguys

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    I was trying to say to do something similar to what Hack proposed but my solution was to use a tablesaw and rip the piece shorter. This could be tricky, or even dangerous, with an inexperienced table operator. It IS how I would do it though. Adding a small piece of wood to build it up would be easier for most.

    I would cut a piece of wood the correct size and then just use some wood glue to attach. You could use some of that blue tape you have as a clamp for an hour or two as the glue dries. I would likely use some spring clamps.

    Once the glue dries (wipe off squeeze out before it dries) then sand smooth, prime and paint before installing.
     
  10. Feb 27, 2008 #10

    1simple

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    Please give me your opinions?

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  11. Feb 27, 2008 #11

    Hack

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    Looking good!

    Is that caulk, or did you put another piece of wood underneath?

    For the shoe molding that goes past the transition piece (part that goes over the gap between wood/tile) I would consider putting the shoe molding in first, then running the transition piece up to the shoe molding. Either way, you may have to caulk and paint to fill any gaps, but if you butt the transition to the shoe, it may look pretty good...
     
  12. Feb 27, 2008 #12

    1simple

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    That isn't caulk, nothing has been caulked, that is a piece of wood.

    Transition piece is already glued down. But I think it looks better to have the shoe molding cut around it, instead of just but into it, like a custom fit or the shoe molding was custom cut around it instead of just butting it up against it. Anyone else agree?

    Thanks
    Curtis
     
  13. Feb 27, 2008 #13

    glennjanie

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    Hello Curtis:
    Yes, I agree the base shoe should be scribed around the transition piece.
    Glenn
     
  14. Feb 28, 2008 #14

    handyguys

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    I would do your floor transition different. Take it up and get your base and shoe correct first. You are ok on the front and right, the left side still needs work. Once you get that correct then you can shape the floor transition to butt nicely to the shoe.
     
  15. Aug 16, 2008 #15

    jmitps

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    I have a similar situation, but with 3 1/2 " moulding instead of quarter round. The transition is between 3/4" hardwood (over a subfloor) to carpeting (no subfloor). The difference is about 3/4". Both areas have significant runs of moulding, so it would take alot of lengthwise trimming to cut down the higher one or to add height to the shorter one. Any ideas??
     

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