Chain Link Fence Post Repair

Discussion in 'General Home Improvement Discussion' started by Elmwoody, Sep 14, 2010.

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  1. Sep 14, 2010 #1

    Elmwoody

    Elmwoody

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    My chain link fence is about 37 years old and in good condition except most of the fence posts have rusted through where the post meets the concrete at ground level.

    Can I repair these posts by inserting a smaller diameter steel tube that will go go between the "good" steel inside the concrete and the "good" steel above the concrete.

    I'd like to avoid setting all new posts.
     
  2. Sep 14, 2010 #2

    kok328

    kok328

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    If you can find some pipe that will fit snuggly into the ID of the old pipe then I see no reason why this won't work. The only thing is that the post in the ground might be full of cement and you won't be able to get the new pipe into that portion of post.
     
  3. Sep 14, 2010 #3

    Elmwoody

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    I hadn't thought about the concrete being in the lower portion of the fence posts. I'll take off a few post caps and measure how far down I can put a broom handle or something to see if the concrete is going to be a problem.

    Elmwoody
     
  4. Sep 20, 2010 #4

    SteelToeS

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    Hey Elmwoody,

    My name is George and I work in Chicago area Home Depot. Here in Chicago area we get these chain link questions all the time .YES you can avoid setting all new posts, no worries. I’m assuming that your line posts are ones that are rusted out (they are only 1-5/8", 16 gauge and they are ones that usually give out first). First cut your line posts where they meet the concrete footing (try to make a nice and clean 90 degree cut by using a fine tooth metal blade). Secondly, get a 6"x6"x1/4" GALVANIZED floor flange, (you can order this at nearest Home Depot, they are made by Master Halco). Take your floor flange and attach it to the concrete footing using some galvanized wedge anchors, like Red Head or Tapcon. Then set your line posts on top of your attached flange and weld down your line posts to the flange (I know some Home Depot stores rent ARC welders). You can also try adding some diagonal bracing for extra support.
    Good luck! Hope it helps!

    SteelToes
    I’m a Home Depot Store Associate, trained and authorized to help people on the Internet

    :clap:
     
  5. Sep 22, 2010 #5

    Elmwoody

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    Hi George,

    Thanks for your guidance on fixing that fence of mine. I'll take a look at those flanges and make sure I'll be able to secure them to the concrete.
    Elmwoody
     
  6. Oct 6, 2010 #6

    remmons

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    I have seen both of these work. The first one will decide if you have enough depth into the existing post, as that when a chainlink fence is installed, an installer will typically pour the mud first, then set the post in. The second method requires you to drill out four holes with a masonry bit (if it is the base I am familiar with), and using drop in anchords, or Redheads, as they are called by the builder.
     
  7. Oct 6, 2010 #7

    oldognewtrick

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    Couldn't you just cut the existing pole flush at ground level and install another post next to it in a new concrete base?
     
  8. Oct 7, 2010 #8

    Elmwoody

    Elmwoody

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    I could but I've been trying to find an easier, less time consuming method.
     
  9. Oct 7, 2010 #9

    remmons

    remmons

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    A more intensive method would be to dig/pull out the existing post base and install a new post with fresh concrete. Somethimes the quick and easy method is not always the right method.
     
  10. Oct 8, 2010 #10

    universalremodeling

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    wow!..thanks for this information george!
     

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