Circuit replacement [15A to 20A]

Discussion in 'Electrical and Wiring' started by Quatrix, Dec 20, 2018.

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  1. Dec 20, 2018 #1

    Quatrix

    Quatrix

    Quatrix

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    Good Day,

    Looking at my circuit breaker panel (attached) I have 180A capacity on left leg and 170A on the right leg. If I decide to hire an electrician to replace my entire circuit #2 with a 20A capacity circuit, is that something that is feasible considering the already uneven currents on both legs? In other words, presently, without doing any work I have a difference of 10A between the right and left legs; later if I decide to replace my 15A circuit (circuit breaker #2) with a 20A breaker and 12/2 AWG, is that something that is acceptable? Let me know please.
     

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  2. Dec 20, 2018 #2

    Snoonyb

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    YES.
     
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  3. Dec 20, 2018 #3

    nealtw

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    You are adding up breakers? I think to balance they look at actual loads.
     
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  4. Dec 20, 2018 #4

    JoeD

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    Adding up breakers means nothing. Your panel is not using the full value of the breakers. Also your panel is not divided down the right and left side. It alternates down each side.
     
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  5. Dec 20, 2018 #5

    Quatrix

    Quatrix

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    JoeD,

    Ok, I agree with you on adding up breakers. However, all of my breakers on the right are even numbered and all of them on the left are odd. I believe that means one side corresponds to Phase A and the other side to Phase B. Anyone correct me if I am wrong.
     
  6. Dec 20, 2018 #6

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    Do you have any 240 breakers on one side?
     
  7. Dec 21, 2018 #7

    Quatrix

    Quatrix

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    nealtw,

    Yes, the Range, Dryer, and A/C are all 240V, double pole breakers on one Phase.
    Range = BKR (SLOTS 1 & 3)
    A/C = BKR (SLOTS 9 & 11)
    Dryer = BRK (SLOTS 5 & 7)
     
  8. Dec 21, 2018 #8

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    You are talking about legs, not phases. each leg is 120 volts, so to get 240 you are connected to both legs. So every other breaker is leg one
    and the ones between them are leg two.
     
  9. Dec 21, 2018 #9

    Quatrix

    Quatrix

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    nealtw,

    Ok, so my range which uses 240V, connected to double pole breaker (slots 1 & 3) uses both legs (phases) for power. Slot 1 would be Phase A and slot 3 would be Phase B. Please confirm. What is the difference between a leg and a phase?
     
  10. Dec 21, 2018 #10

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    That would be way above my pay grade to teach that. but most house deal with one phase.
     
  11. Dec 21, 2018 #11

    WyrTwister

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    If you actually want to know how close the loadcenter is to being balanced , use a clamp on amp meter . On the 2 incoming hots .

    If you are OK with working on a hot loadcenter . Can not check amperage if you kill the power .

    If you are not OK with a hot loadcenter , leave it alone or hire an electrician .

    God bless
    Wyr
     
  12. Dec 21, 2018 #12

    Quatrix

    Quatrix

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    nealtw,

    I understood you. We take our single phase and divide it into two legs. The range uses both of those legs but it is only one, single phase. If the double pole breaker, to which my range is connected, takes up slots 1 & 3 that means it is connected to both legs where the voltage between them is 240V. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  13. Dec 21, 2018 #13

    nealtw

    nealtw

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    That is the way I understand it so all your 240 breakers are balanced already as they take mostly balanced from both legs.
     
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  14. Dec 21, 2018 #14

    Snoonyb

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    A "phase" is described in the following example; sinusoidal sine wave

    The peaks of each wave equal 120V in a single phase service supply and are 180 degrees out. In 3 phase they are 120 degrees out. All equal 360.

    Your breakers are odd numbered on one side and even on the other and a 240V supply is connected to both sides of the supplied service.

    The primary buss bars in your service alternate side to side.
     
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