colored spackle?

House Repair Talk

Help Support House Repair Talk:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

DougL

New Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2023
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Location
Dallas TX
I have a outdoor shed with 2x6 fascia that I think are weather resistant. But they're about 40 years old, and have some splits in them. I'd like to just spackle over those defects, but these boards are unfinished and weathered. and spackle is bright white! Can I get "natural weathered wood" tinted spackle, or can I tint the stuff myself? I guess I could use wood filler, but that's more pricey.
 
Welcome.
If you add a photo it will give us a better Idea of what you are attempting to repair.
 
I don't think a photo is particularly relevant. The issue is whether spackle HAS to be white, and if it is tintable, how would one do it.
 
You're correct, sparkle doesn't have too be white, and you are free to using any of a myriad of materials to alter it's, out of the package color.

However, you stated, that you've surmised that, "I think are weather resistant", but are unsure which of the several, weather resistant materials, available, it may be.

There are a number of
atmospheric issues that affect how different materials, affected, display deterioration, from those elements.

So, perhaps, in aiding us, to aide you, you could consider posting a photo, in an act of assisting us, in assisting you.
 
There is spackle, wood filler and caulk. IMO and with the information given I would select a Tinted Exterior Caulk for your project.



When I think of spackle I think of a product to be used on interior plaster or drywall work and painted over.
 
That's a fair point about spackle as being largely for interior use, but we just had some work done on fascia on our house, and those pros filled in gaps with regular spackle. Of course, it gets painted over promptly, so it's reasonably well sealed. But that's a good point, that exterior caulk can be bought tinted. The fascia on this shed is unfinished pressure-treated wood (probably CCA, because it's pretty old), so white caulk is a no no.
 
Last edited:
If they used "spackle" to fill anything on the outside you got ripped off!
Spackle is just for filling small nail holes inside!
It's likely splitting because it was allowed to go to long between repaintings.
Any filler used now is just going to fail from expantion and contraction.
As mentioned we really need a picture!
And there is no magic wand fix, whatever used, the whole thing will need to be repainted to get it to match!
 
Over the years, I've used a few methods for similar problems. Here are the ones that have lasted a long time (at least 20 years):

Auto Body Filler: Can pre-color with solvent based coloring.
Available in white. Easily painted. Deep repairs have to be built up in 1/4" layers. Expands and contracts with the wood (like it does on cars). Some brands are waterproof. Super easy to sand. I have lots on my house that was applied over 30 years ago. It's in rain, sun and snow- sometimes built up against it.
Easy to paint with latex or oil or lacquer. Holds all paints very well. If waterproof type, does not have to be painted.

Sawdust Mixed With Type I PVA Glue Thinned 10% with Vinegar (Example = Titebone III): Can be pre-colored, but not lighter than tan.
Can make relatively deep repairs, 100% waterproof when dry. Expands & contracts with the wood. Does not have to be fine dust, saw blade dust is fine. Relatively easy to sand with open coat paper. Does not have to be painted due to the glue. I have a lot on my garage T-11 where the T1-11 rotted from snow piling up.

Durham's Water Putty Mixed With Type I PVA Glue Thinned 10% with Vinegar: Can be colored, but not lighter than tan.
Solid repair, lasts forever. No paint needed due tot he glue. Relatively quick drying (very quick without the glue). Must be painted if no glue was used. Kind of difficult to sand. I have some on my house that has been in service for more than 20 years. It's in direct sun, rain, snow.

Durham's Mixed With Water: Can be colored, but not lighter than light tan. I have heard of mixing latex paint in the powder to color it. Never tired coloring it that way myself.
Not as waterproof as when mixed with glue, but is A-OK when painted. Dries faster than when mixed with glue.
There is a lot of this on my asbestos-cement tiles, wood fascia and rake boards that has been there over 30 years. (And some that I put on this morning, by coincidence.)



Note-
The only fillers that I have had trouble with popping off due to expansion and contraction are store bought pre-made wood fillers and Bondo brand any kind of fillers. (Duraglass is good and waterproof. Advantage Lite is great and easy to sand)
Durham's, auto body fillers and home made stuff don't pop off if the surface is clean, dry and solid.

Durham's was a smart invention. It's simply molding plaster with wheat dextrin mixed in. (Benefiber)

Hope This Helps!

Paul
 
Atobody filler is an interesting idea and, of course, there are tints made for it.

If they used "spackle" to fill anything on the outside you got ripped off!
Spackle is just for filling small nail holes inside!
It's likely splitting because it was allowed to go to long between repaintings.
Any filler used now is just going to fail from expantion and contraction.
As mentioned we really need a picture!
And there is no magic wand fix, whatever used, the whole thing will need to be repainted to get it to match!
DryDex is fine outside. Specifically approved for that.
 
Atobody filler is an interesting idea and, of course, there are tints made for it.


DryDex is fine outside. Specifically approved for that.
I never knew one could get tints for auto body filler, beyond picking the hardener color. Thanks for sharing this DougL.

Lots of on line stuff says one can't use auto body filler on wood because it doesn't expand in heat like the wood does. I'd have to say a car fender in Phoenix expands a whole lot more than a piece of wood- yet the filler doesn't pop off. (I have lots of body filler on my house. It doesn't fall off, except for Bondo brand for some reason.)
 
What I know about Bondo and auto body fillers and other uses.



Bondo is a brand name but also is commonly used for all the very fine textured fillers. IMO they are semi porous and don’t do well without protective coverings they are similar in some ways with auto primer paints that are intended to sanded and fill in small flaws.



Bondo type fillers can be thinned with auto body fiberglass resin and doing so produces a harder surface and one that can be skimmed very thin. We used to do this a lot when building speaker enclosures to hide screw holes and joints in the wood and then paint them with a crinkle paint. They looked like they were molded when done.



There are a number of auto body fillers that have a thicker base material made from chopped fiberglass some short strand some very long and hard to work with like Tiger Hair.



Years ago I was having an old home painted and one of the wood windows the painter told me had to be replaced as the whole corner was rotted out. I told him I would repair it and have it for him to paint the next morning. I cut out the rot and peppered the ends of the raw wood with drywall screws leaving them sticking out where they would be buried in the repair. Then I made a form out of cardboard the shape I wanted and packed it full of Tiger Hair working it around all the screws. Waited 30 minutes and took the 4” sander disk to it and then gave it a coating of a thinner auto body filler and sanded that out. The painter couldn’t believe I saved the old window and asked me if I wanted a job fixing them for him. That was 30 years ago and the window is still working.



Being able to thin all these products with fiberglass resin is one of the best tricks I have found.
 
There are a number of auto body fillers that have a thicker base material made from chopped fiberglass some short strand some very long and hard to work with like Tiger Hair.
You might like Duraglass, Bud. Tiger Hair sure is difficult to work with.

Duraglass' stands are very small diameter. The product shapes easily with a sharp cheese grater style rasp. It is harder to sand than high-talc fillers, but can sand to gloss smooth. It's waterproof even if left unpainted or submerged.
 
Back
Top