Condesation on windows

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Billbill84

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This could indicate an HVAC problem. Where are you? How old is the house? How old is the heating system? What type of heating system is it?
How could this indicate an HVAC issue? That's actually the least likely being as how common Window condensation is.
I'm willing to bet the OP has old Pella casement windows or older double hung
 

Billbill84

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Here's my 2c and please anyone feel free to correct me if my logic is flawed.

1) inside condensation is always on the bottom of the glass because that's where the any outside moisture will sit via the outer portion of the runoff sill, this area is most vaunerable because now that area has the biggest "delta T" (temp differential between outside draft and inside heat). Add outside draft to inside warm air (even if inside air is dry from heating), and you'll have condensation regardless!
What you can try is to keep ceiling fan on at night. What style of windows you have?
 

swimmer_spe

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How could this indicate an HVAC issue? That's actually the least likely being as how common Window condensation is.
I'm willing to bet the OP has old Pella casement windows or older double hung
Here's my 2c and please anyone feel free to correct me if my logic is flawed.

1) inside condensation is always on the bottom of the glass because that's where the any outside moisture will sit via the outer portion of the runoff sill, this area is most vaunerable because now that area has the biggest "delta T" (temp differential between outside draft and inside heat). Add outside draft to inside warm air (even if inside air is dry from heating), and you'll have condensation regardless!
What you can try is to keep ceiling fan on at night. What style of windows you have?
I don't know the age of my windows, but they are double pane vinyl windows.
 

Bob Reynolds

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We've gone though a number of scenarios on this problem. It seems the OP has an excess moisture problem within the dwelling. The bottom line is that the excess moisture has to be eliminated. That can be done several ways. He indicated the prior owner took a dehumidifier with them. Perhaps acquiring another dehumidifier might solve the problem.

Perhaps opening all of the windows and airing out the house might solve the problem. (It's probably pretty cold right now in Canada, so this might be an issue)

Running fans (ceiling and box) might solve the issue.

I would also want to determine where this excess moisture is coming from.
 

swimmer_spe

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We've gone though a number of scenarios on this problem. It seems the OP has an excess moisture problem within the dwelling. The bottom line is that the excess moisture has to be eliminated. That can be done several ways. He indicated the prior owner took a dehumidifier with them. Perhaps acquiring another dehumidifier might solve the problem.

Perhaps opening all of the windows and airing out the house might solve the problem. (It's probably pretty cold right now in Canada, so this might be an issue)

Running fans (ceiling and box) might solve the issue.

I would also want to determine where this excess moisture is coming from.
My first step is acquiring dehumidifier.
My second step is to figure out where the moisture is coming from. I think it is from the massive exposed rock in our basement.

Hopefully, that fixes the problem. If not, I'll have to figure something else out. Opening windows is not a good solution here as it is well below freezing (-15C last night).
 

Billbill84

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Bottom edge window condensation doesn't always mean excessive moisture in the home. It simply means that there is a large temp difference on the bottom of the glass which is naturally the coldest area. Could be something as simple as some air leakage near the bottom edge. All my windows have this, the new ones not nearly as bad. And when the outside temp falls below 30 degrees I struggle to maintain as low as 20 RH in the house. My hygrometer bottoms out at 16 RH and sits there until outside temps get up to about 35 degrees. Still have bottom edge window condensation on some nights.
 

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